Terror Suspects Staying in U.S. on Revoked Visas; Failure to Close Loophole Hit

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 24, 2004 | Go to article overview

Terror Suspects Staying in U.S. on Revoked Visas; Failure to Close Loophole Hit


Byline: Audrey Hudson, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Suspected terrorists are not kicked out of the United States after their visas are revoked, even though Congress last year asked the Department of Homeland Security to fix a legal loophole that has allowed more than 100 people with links to terrorism to skip deportation, according to a key lawmaker.

Sen. Charles E. Grassley, Iowa Republican and chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, told Homeland Security chief Tom Ridge that he is frustrated and concerned that "simple changes" have not been made since House and Senate hearings were held last July.

"It is amazing to me that such a simple and straightforward solution to such a dangerous and well-known problem continues to languish in the slow-moving bureaucracy," Mr. Grassley said in a letter Tuesday.

The changes requested by Congress would allow government officials to question, detain or deport foreigners whose visas have been revoked for reasons linked to terrorism.

"Promises were made, but the promises have not been kept. As a result, we continue to be at risk," Mr. Grassley said.

Officials in the Department of Homeland Security, Justice Department and State Department are examining laws and regulations already on the books to address the problem. Under current law, visitors cannot be automatically detained if they are "in status" with their admittance.

For example, if a visitor on a three-month visa has been in the country for six months, he or she is "out of status" and can be deported. However, if the visitor has only been in the United States one month, he or she is obeying the rules and is "in status."

The State Department originally had authority over the issuance and revocation of visas, but in an agreement reached last September, the responsibility of visa policy was transferred to Homeland Security (DHS).

"Once DHS learns of a visa revocation, it immediately authorizes an investigation of the individual whose visa has been revoked. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Terror Suspects Staying in U.S. on Revoked Visas; Failure to Close Loophole Hit
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.