Too Much Mad-Cow Safety?

By Prugh, Tom | World Watch, July-August 2004 | Go to article overview

Too Much Mad-Cow Safety?


Prugh, Tom, World Watch


Last December, the first known case of mad cow disease (bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE) in the United States was discovered in a Washington state cow imported from Canada. A panel of experts assembled by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has said there is a "high probability" of further BSE cases in the United States. The true rate is unknown, and the department currently tests only a fraction (21,000 in 2003) of the 35 million U.S. cattle slaughtered every year.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Yet USDA is refusing to allow a small, upscale beef-packing company to test all of its cattle, voluntarily and at its own expense, for BSE. A USDA spokesman says that such comprehensive testing would imply "a consumer safety aspect that is not scientifically warranted." The company, Denver-based Creekstone Farms, normally exports much of its beef to Japan, which has banned imports of untested U.S. beef. Creekstone is losing $200,000 a day and says it could go out of business. Larger packing companies, which can sell other meats, have opposed such testing.

Humans who eat beef from cattle with BSE may develop a similar illness called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), which is untreatable and always fatal. An outbreak of BSE in Britain in the 1980s has led to over 140 confirmed vCJD deaths there. The outbreak was spread by the now-banned practice of feeding cattle the ground-up remains of other ruminant animals, especially sheep. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Too Much Mad-Cow Safety?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.