Charges Ruled out in Drowning Case

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), July 9, 2004 | Go to article overview

Charges Ruled out in Drowning Case


Cps says it lacks evidence

No charges are to be brought against three men arrested when a young man drowned after a night out.

Father-of-one Tony Dockerty, 25, was celebrating Newcastle's UEFA Cup win over Basel with a night on the Quayside when he fell from the east side of the Swing Bridge in November last year.

He had gone with friends to the Tuxedo Princess, moored on the Gateshead Quays, to take advantage of a "drink all you want" offer.

Tony, from Throckley, Newcastle, was seen trying to swim towards a pontoon in the middle of the bridge, but currents swept him towards the High Level Bridge.

A search was launched and it took weeks to recover his body, which was released to his family only in January.

Three people were questioned and released on police bail.

But it has now emerged the Crown Prosecution Service has met his devastated mother, Lynn, and told her it is not pursuing any prosecution, despite claims that Tony was pushed.

Lynn says she is convinced her son did not fall and plans to challenge the CPS's decision by writing to the Director of Public Prosecutions.

She said: "The police visited and told me they were not going to court on the advice of the CPS. …

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