Leave the Lego Men as They Are

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), July 9, 2004 | Go to article overview

Leave the Lego Men as They Are


I am writing in defence of the lego men. Art is a personal choice. For every person that likes something there will be that does not.

So, what right has the newly elected Lib Dem council got to presume the majority of people do not like the lego men surrounding the war memorial? Once a decision has been taken you should stick with it. Why should they be replaced by railings "more suitable"? Who says they are and what justifies the extra cost?

We should applaud our city and its art not destroy it because of a few dissenting voices. Not everyone likes The Angel of the North or The Millennium Bridge but the people of Gateshead do not campaign to demolish them. Get on with running the council on what you were elected instead of righting perceived wrongs.

BARBARA LINGARD (Mrs) - Montague Avenue, Newcastle.

Smacking a worthy lesson

THIS question of not smacking children will never work. Some parents have good children, some have wild children. Children are very astute; the first or maybe second thing they learn is how to manipulate people, don't they?

My family live in Sweden, where parents can go to prison if smacking is reported.

On one of my visits there, we went to the zoo; there were a number of people about, including a small boy who was badly misbehaving. The mother stood angrily reprimanding him. She was nearly crying with frustration because she could do nothing else. Doesn't everybody lash out when angry?

I know I did when the family came over here. My two Swedish grandsons know the consequences of smacks from parents.

The older one wanted my daughter-in-law to buy him a trumpet he'd seen in the window. Because she wouldn't he cried very loudly, and he's only nine years old! …

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