Nieman Foundation Announces U.S. and International Fellows for 2005

By Fiore, Lois | Nieman Reports, Summer 2004 | Go to article overview

Nieman Foundation Announces U.S. and International Fellows for 2005


Fiore, Lois, Nieman Reports


Thirteen U.S. journalists and 12 international journalists were appointed to the 67th class of Nieman Fellows. The new U.S. fellows and their areas of interest are:

Mary (Molly) Bingham, photographer, WorldPicture News Agency: To enhance textual storytelling capabilities to pair them with existing photography skills through the study of writing, journalism and history.

Cheryl Carpenter, deputy managing editor, The Charlotte Observer: The nature and practice of leadership and unique strategies for business development.

Richard Chacon, deputy foreign editor, The Boston Globe: Religion, poverty and public health and their impact on the development of U.S. foreign policy.

James Daly, editor in chief, The George Lucas Educational Foundation: How nontechnical forces, including cultural and economic factors, shape the use and evolution of modern technologies.

Edward Gargan, Asia bureau chief based in Beijing, Newsday: The intersection of race, religion and politics in Latin America along with the state of Latin American popular culture.

Amy Goldstein, White House domestic policy reporter, The Washington Post: The roots and implications of civil liberties-restricting policies that have been imposed as part of the effort to curb terrorism since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

Joshua Hammer, Jerusalem bureau chief, Newsweek: The business operations of terror organizations: How they move money internationally; which governments aid radical groups; how charities, banks and money-transfer agencies deliver money to terror organizations, and how effectively "coalition" governments have been at hindering the cash flow.

Louise Kiernan, projects reporter, Chicago Tribune: The role of women in the United States work force and its impact on social and labor reform movements in the 20th century. She will hold the Louis Stark Memorial Fellowship for journalists who specialize in labor, workplace or related issues. Funding is provided by the Stark Fellowship Fund in honor of Louis Stark, a pioneer in the field of labor reporting.

Maggie Mulvihill, investigative editor, the Boston Herald: The role of federal and state courts in barring access to public information and restrictions of press freedom since the September 11, 2001, attacks.

Amy Ellis Nutt, feature writer, The Star-Ledger of Newark, N.J.: The social, legal and ethical implications of advances in neuroscience on the treatment, enhancement and manipulation of the human brain.

H. Joseph O'Connor, Jr., producer, ABC News Nightline: The nature of mental illness and treatments for mental disorders. Also Irish literature and history as they relate to personal heritage and storytelling.

Elizabeth Rubin, contributing writer, The New York Times Magazine: Comparative religion, religious history and their impact on society; Arabic language; the concept of "American interests" and filmmaking.

Twelve U.S. journalists were selected by a five-person committee: Charles A. Ferguson, a 1966 Nieman Fellow, retired editor of The Times-Picayune of New Orleans; Maria Henson, a 1994 Nieman Fellow, assistant managing editor for enterprise of the Austin American-Statesman; Juliette Kayyem, senior fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard; Lester Sloan, a 1976 Nieman Fellow, freelance photographer, and Web magazine publisher, and Bob Giles, a 1966 Nieman Fellow, committee chair, and Nieman Foundation Curator.

In addition to the 12 U.S. journalists selected by the committee, another fellow will join the class:

Chris Waddle, vice president/ news, The Anniston (Ala. …

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Nieman Foundation Announces U.S. and International Fellows for 2005
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