Travel: 48 Hours in Hamburg

Sunday Mirror (London, England), July 11, 2004 | Go to article overview

Travel: 48 Hours in Hamburg


Byline: ROBIN GAULDIE

GERMANY'S liveliest seaport gave the Beatles their big break and the world one of its favourite foods when it put a beef patty in a bun and everyone called it a hamburger. The city of Hamburg is cosmopolitan, lively, stylish... and just a little bit naughty. Here's how ROBIN GAULDIE made the most of a short break....

FRIDAY NIGHT

HEAD for the St Pauli district on Hamburg's waterfront. It's no longer the rough and ready assortment of seamen's dives it was when the Beatles bought their first black leather jackets here, but it's still the centre of the city's rock and roll nightlife.

A red light still shines over the sleaze of the Reeperbahn where ladies of the night beckon from behind plate-glass windows. If you need more titillation, check out the slightly more tasteful Erotic Art Museum (Bernhard- Nocht-Str 69, open 10am to 2am).

Be sure to buy a Hamburg Card (pounds 5 per day or pounds 10 a weekend at the airport or hotels and stations) for free public transport and free admission or reduced prices to most of the city's museums and attractions.

Avoid the more garish tourist traps and head for Christiansen's (Pinnasberg 60, between St Pauli and Fischmarkt), a classic Hamburg bar with great beer; China Lounge (Nobistor 14) a trendy disco that looks as if it was styled by Fu Manchu, or Rubin (Grosse Freiheit 10,), St Pauli's most stylish club. There are plenty of restaurants where you can get a three-course meal for pounds 10 to pounds 15.

SATURDAY

MORNING

CLIMB to the top of St Michael's Church tower, symbol of Hamburg, for a view of the city from the viewing platform 82 metres up Don't worry - there's a lift. Admission is pounds 1.50.

Then take a stroll through the upmarket shopping arcades around the city centre. Hamburg has more than a dozen traffic-free shopping areas - and 150 street cafes. Top shopping streets and arcades include Neuer Wall - a mile of luxury stores - along with Jungfernstieg and the dinky Levantehaus mall. Spoil yourself, as Hamburgers do, with a glass of sekt (sparkling wine), a plate of lobster or a dollop of caviar at one of the stand-up seafood lunch bars in the Hanse-Viertel (Hanseatic Quarter), definitely the finest of the typical Hamburg passages. If you're on a tight budget, go for rollmop herring and a schooner of fine Hamburg beer. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Travel: 48 Hours in Hamburg
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.