Strange Bedfellows

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 14, 2004 | Go to article overview

Strange Bedfellows


Byline: John McCaslin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Strange bedfellows

"Here's one apple that fell far from the tree," boasts Ann Lewis of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.

"Ron Reagan, the son of former President Ronald Reagan - hailed 'father' of modern conservatism - is a candid critic of the Bush administration and will speak at the Democratic National Convention in Boston on July 27."

"Ouch, that one hurts," she says.

Speaking of hurting, the Democratic Party had better warn Virginia Democratic Rep. James P. Moran not to remind the young Mr. Reagan during the Democratic convention of his pledge to do everything in his power to remove his late father's name from Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport.

Restoring dignity

Speaking of former President Reagan and Virginia Rep. James P. Moran, it so happens that the Democratic incumbent's Republican opponent in this 2004 election year is Lisa Marie Cheney, whose husband, U.S. Navy Cmdr. David Peter Cheney - no relation to Vice President Dick Cheney - recently completed a tour aboard the new aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan.

In fact, Mrs. Cheney stood alongside her husband on the carrier's hangar deck last summer when her husband welcomed former first lady Nancy Reagan on board for the ship's commissioning.

By her own right, Mrs. Cheney is an authority on defense. She's the president of a national security firm specializing in missile defense, and if elected to Congress pledges to provide U.S. troops with the most advanced technology and equipment. She also proposes to work closely with President Bush and Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge on domestic security for the Washington area.

Beyond that, Mrs. Cheney has made "restoring dignity" to Northern Virginia's left-leaning 8th District her campaign slogan, citing Mr. Moran's long list of personal troubles since first being elected to Congress in 1990.

It includes Mr. Moran's questionable financial dealings with people who had business before Congress, his "discriminative" statements aimed at certain segments of the community, his Sunday verbal fight with his Catholic pastor over abortion, and his rowdy if not violent behavior on Capitol Hill, including shoving a fellow member of Congress off the floor of the House. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Strange Bedfellows
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.