Towards an English Bibliographical List on the Canary Islands

By Gonzalez Cruz, Isabel | Atlantis, revista de la Asociación Española de Estudios Anglo-Norteamericanos, December 2000 | Go to article overview

Towards an English Bibliographical List on the Canary Islands


Gonzalez Cruz, Isabel, Atlantis, revista de la Asociación Española de Estudios Anglo-Norteamericanos


An examination of the main bibliographies compiled by several specialists on topics such as Travels in Spain or English-Spanish contact throughout history reveals that most of the publications in English concerning the Canary Islands seem to have been ignored. It appears that there is quite a copious_amount of literature on various subjects that remains unknown not only to the general public but also to many scholars. It is our aim to provide a preliminary bibliographical list that may help solve this problem and serve the purpose of making at least some of these works accessible to those interested in the subject.

INTRODUCTION

The Canary Islands have long been the source of an inestimable number of publications which range over a whole variety of subjects. Among these we might include a great deal of travel books, tourist guides, as well as other works with a historical, socio-cultural or even literary and linguistic orientation. We should also mention all sorts of scientific studies, covering various disciplines such as anthropology, astronomy, biology, botany, entomology, geology, ornithology and other fields within zoology, together with numerous researches related to climatic and health issues.

Not surprisingly, many of the titles of these works are in English. The close contact that Canarians have maintained throughout history with a great deal of British traders, seamen, scientists, and with many other travellers who either visited or became permanent or temporary residents might explain the expanding interest arisen in the English-speaking world for this Spanish archipelago, particularly over the last two centuries (cf. Bethencourt Massieu 1956; Castillo 1992-93, 1998; Fajardo Spinola 1977; Fernandez-Armesto et al. 1995; Garcia Perez 1988; Gonzalez Cruz 1995; Herrera Pique 1987; Martin Hernandez 1990; Quintana Navarro 1992a, 1992b).

So far, we have collected a total number of 204 items, which certainly results in a long (though probably incomplete) bibliographical list. However, most of this literature remains unknown not only to the general public but, inconceivably enough, to many scholars whose specialities are either Travels in Spain or English-Spanish contact throughout history. In this paper we examine the main bibliographies compiled by several specialists in these fields, and we find that most English works on the Canary Islands are conspicuous by their absence from these catalogues. As a first step to solve this problem, it is our aim here to provide a preliminary bibliographical list that may serve the purpose of helping to make at least some of all those works accessible.

1. REASONS FOR AN OUTSTANDING ABSENCE

As Garcia Perez (1988: 17) explained, when searching for references to these islands in the many books about English travellers in Spain one is immediately struck by the fact that the Canaries have largely been ignored. Apparently, the islands do not count in this literature, despite the existence of numerous travel accounts published by all kinds of visitors, including members of scientific expeditions. In our opinion, two main reasons might be given as explanations for this strange case of omission. Firstly, some of the publications only deal indirectly with the issues for which the Canaries are widely known, and therefore the names of these islands do not appear in their titles. This is precisely one of the factors that somehow has hampered our task of finding and adding them to a list that we believe can certainly be increased.

Secondly, in many bibliographical compilations, the Canary Islands have not been considered as a part of Spain, let alone Europe. Conversely, many authors have tended to include most of these works in the same section as other studies related to the African continent, including journeys to the West Coast. In fact, after studying the references compiled in classic works like those by Raymond Foulche-Delbosc (1986), Arturo Farinelli (1942, 1944, 1959) or Joss Alberich (1978), we found that they hardly mention any of the bibliographical items that we have included in our list. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Towards an English Bibliographical List on the Canary Islands
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.