At Last Some Emotion Flowed through the Intellectualism; Quentin Letts First Night Review

Daily Mail (London), July 20, 2004 | Go to article overview

At Last Some Emotion Flowed through the Intellectualism; Quentin Letts First Night Review


Byline: QUENTIN LETTS

GALILEO'S DAUGHTER

By Timberlake Wertenbaker:

Bath Theatre Royal

NOT for Rebecca Hall the normal duty of a daughter's devotion, seeing Dad once a fortnight over Sunday lunch, say.

This young actress has spent weeks rehearsing a world premiere of an ambitious play. Her director? The former National Theatre chief Sir Peter Hall. Her father.

It is impossible to watch this self- consciously serious piece without being thumped by the parallels.

The heroine (Miss Hall) is Maria Celeste, daughter of the Vaticanbaiting stargazer Galileo Galilei.

Maria Celeste is a nun in the same Mother Church that wants to declare her father a heretic.

Maria Celeste lives for her father, much though he complicates her life.

Maybe Rebecca Hall knows the feeling.

Timberlake Wertenbaker gives her characters little to do on stage. She's so keen to beat the audience round the brow, delivering lines heavy-laden with meaning, that the actors soon run out of natural gestures.

Sir Peter's sparse staging barely helps. This might make a better radio play.

Julian Glover as Galileo and William Chubb, playing a slippery Father Confessor, are best at bringing crackle to proceedings. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

At Last Some Emotion Flowed through the Intellectualism; Quentin Letts First Night Review
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.