Innovations Abound in Power-Savvy Notebooks

T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education), January 1992 | Go to article overview

Innovations Abound in Power-Savvy Notebooks


University faculty and administrators are among today's most demanding notebook PC users. Their constant mobility and advanced applications require state-of-the-art notebook technology. It was just such users Zenith Data Systems had in mind when it designed the MastersPort 386SL and MastersPort 386SLe.

Both MastersPorts make use of the i386SL microprocessor to deliver desktop capability in a portable package. The 7-pound SLe model has an 85MB hard drive, the SL model a 60MB hard drive. Each offers 2MB of RAM (user-expandable to 8MB), and sophisticated power management features that extend battery life up to eight hours* using Rest/Resume working conditions. This powerful configuration lets educators duplicate their office or laboratory environment on the road or in the classroom, complete with the comfort of a full-size keyboard.

* Maximizing Battery Life

Perhaps the most significant technological advances offered by the MastersPort 386SL and 386SLe are in power conservation. Standby mode allows a user to shut down quickly, maintaining work in memory up to 12 hours while reducing power consumption five-fold. Standby mode is particularly well-suited to the campus environment, where lectures, research, and the inevitable interruptions during office hours all create a highly intermittent work style.

A hardware-resident Rest/Resume mode replaces an on/off button for further dramatic power savings, with an important difference: work is held in memory for up to two weeks and returned to the original state at the touch of a button. To protect work in memory from unauthorized access, users can have the MastersPort prompt for a password when it is activated again. Both Standby and Rest/Resume modes can be set to occur automatically if no use is detected for a preselected time.

* Desktop-sized Hard Drive

An 85MB hard drive, standard on the SLe model, provides room for most users to duplicate their desktop storage, so administrators and professors no longer have to decide what to take with them when heading across campus or across the country. …

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