Sandra's Advice: Can You Tune in to Others' Thoughts? SCIENCE BACKS TELEPATHY

Sunday Mirror (London, England), July 25, 2004 | Go to article overview

Sandra's Advice: Can You Tune in to Others' Thoughts? SCIENCE BACKS TELEPATHY


Byline: Sandra Ramdhanie

RECENT findings from a prestigious German university proving the existence of mind-to-mind communication come as no surprise to me.

I have been saying it has existed for more than 20 years.

Telepathy is the psychic talent which enables communication to occur between minds.

We are all capable of transmitting and receiving thoughts, ideas, feelings, sensations and mental images.

The term, telepathy, is derived from the Greek terms tele ("distant") and pathe ("occurrence" or "feeling").

The first recorded experiments to research the existence of this talent occurred in Ancient Greece. The term was coined in 1882 by the French psychical researcher Fredric WH Myers, a founder of the Society for Psychical Research.

In tribal societies such as the native American Indians and the Aborigines of Australia telepathy is accepted as a normal human faculty, while Western society considered it a special ability belonging to mystics and psychics.

Throughout the ages psychologists and psychiatrists became aware of its existence.

Sigmund Freud deemed it a regressive, primitive faculty that was lost in the course of evolution, but which still had the ability to manifest itself under certain conditions.

Psychiatrist Carl Jung considered it a function of synchronicity, or "mean-ingful coincidence".

Psychologist and philo-sopher William James was very impressed with his findings regarding tele-pathy and encouraged more research into it. …

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Sandra's Advice: Can You Tune in to Others' Thoughts? SCIENCE BACKS TELEPATHY
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