Recommendations for Evaluating Accreditation Guideline Outcomes Assessment Methods for Accredited Environmental Health Programs in the United States

By Arnold, Stephen D.; Kozel, Charles T. et al. | Journal of Environmental Health, July-August 2004 | Go to article overview

Recommendations for Evaluating Accreditation Guideline Outcomes Assessment Methods for Accredited Environmental Health Programs in the United States


Arnold, Stephen D., Kozel, Charles T., Velarde, Lily D., Journal of Environmental Health


Introduction

A Brief History of EHAC

The National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council (EHAC) is an independent organization whose mission is to accredit environmental health programs offered in national and regional institutions of higher education. These programs prepare students for entry into careers in environmental health, environmental protection, and industrial hygiene (EHAC, 2003).

EHAC was established in 1967 as the National Accreditation Council for Environmental Health Curricula. It is an autonomous organization that is related to and works closely with the National Environmental Health Association, from which it evolved. The purpose of the council is to enhance the education and training of students who intend to become environmental health science and protection professionals. The council is composed of highly qualified professionals representing academic, government, and industrial communities. Over its 28-year history, it has consistently worked to upgrade the quality of education and training delivered by the programs it accredits (EHAC, 2003).

EHAC is the only accrediting agency in the United States for environmental health programs. The council has accredited 27 undergraduate and graduate programs in both public and private institutions across the United States. Since 1989, accredited programs have placed over 1,500 well-qualified graduates into the environmental health workforce. Graduates of accredited programs hold positions with federal, state, and local health agencies; the military; the U.S. Public Health Service; various universities; and numerous companies, including many Fortune 500 companies (EHAC, 2003).

Accreditation indicates that an academic program has the curriculum, faculty, facilities, and institutional support necessary to provide quality education in environmental health science and protection. Only students from accredited programs are eligible to participate as sanitarians in the Commission Officer Student Extern Training Program (COSTEP) of the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS). Another benefit for students who graduate from an accredited program is that those students have priority in USPHS hiring practices. Many states recognize graduation from an accredited program as meeting a specific standard needed to register environmental health specialists or sanitarians (EHAC, 2003).

Numerous accrediting agencies throughout the United States are "recognized" (see definitions below) either by the U.S. Department of Education (USDE) or by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). Currently. EHAC is not recognized by either entity. This paper was written to provide guidance to EHAC on outcomes assessment and other areas related to EHAC's consideration of pursuing recognition by either USDE or CHEA. In recent years, EHAC has been working to obtain comprehensive and systematic information about key elements related to environmental health science and protection and the accreditation process.

Definition of Accreditation and Recognition

For the purposes of this article, two important terms are defined: accreditation and recognition.

"Accreditation" is a process of external quality review used by the higher education community to scrutinize colleges, universities, and educational programs for quality assurance and quality improvement. In the United States, accreditation is carried out by private, nonprofit organizations designed specifically for this purpose (CHEA, 2001).

"Recognition" is a process of external quality review of accrediting organizations to affirm their quality and effectiveness. In the United States, recognition is carried out by a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Education (USDE), and by a private organization, the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) (CHEA, 2001).

USDE Requirements for Outcomes Assessment

For more information on the USDE procedures and criteria for the recognition of accrediting agencies, visit the agency's Web site at http://www. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Recommendations for Evaluating Accreditation Guideline Outcomes Assessment Methods for Accredited Environmental Health Programs in the United States
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.