Election Postponed to Preserve Democracy

By Gillenkirk, Jeff | The Nation, August 2, 2004 | Go to article overview

Election Postponed to Preserve Democracy


Gillenkirk, Jeff, The Nation


American counterterrorism officials, citing what they call "alarming" intelligence about a possible Qaeda strike inside the United States this fall, are reviewing a proposal that could allow for the postponement of the November presidential election in the event of such an attack, Newsweek has learned.

--Newsweek, July 19 issue

Transcript of the OCTOBER 28, 2004, speech, from the Oval Office, by George W. Bush

My Fellow Citizens,

Our democracy has flourished for more than 200 years, nourished by the courageous spirit of the American people and the blood of American patriots. Ours is the longest continuous democratic government in the history of mankind. It has been a beacon of freedom, and a symbol of hope, to generations of people the world over. The system by which we choose our leaders today is the envy of the world. Through our process of free debate and open elections, we assure our friends and our enemies alike not only of our continuing stability, but of our strength.

I have no doubt that these are the very virtues that have drawn the most evil forces in the world today to target our system for destruction. The shadowy networks of deadly terrorist groups and the criminal regimes that support them seek to sow doubts that this free and informed debate of issues, and the orderly succession of democratically elected leaders, cannot work. They want to prove that their evil vision of Chaos, Terror and Tyranny will prevail instead.

But they will not succeed. Not on my watch--and not on yours. America is too strong. America is too smart. America is too determined to remain that beacon of freedom in a world where freedom grows more precious every day.

As a citizen of this nation, I am certain you have heard the reports of efforts by the Al Qaeda terrorist network to disrupt the 2004 presidential election, and to disrupt the elections for the United States Congress, the United States Senate and the elections of state and local officials across our land.

Today, it is my solemn duty to inform you that agents of our Department of Homeland Security have confirmed without a shadow of a doubt that these reports are true. Al Qaeda operatives have been apprehended on American soil, carrying plans for placing high-intensity explosive devices and biohazardous materials in strategic voting precincts throughout the United States. These plans reveal intentions to kill and maim American voters at polling places in at least eleven states--in the South, the Midwest, in California and in my home state of Texas.

Diagrams seized with these terrorists show evidence of long-term surveillance of specific homes and places of worship used for voting. Their clear intention is to shift our attention with panic and weaken our morale with fear. They clearly hope to intimidate the American people, and to weaken our confidence in our government's ability to protect its citizens and our cherished democratic institutions.

We have seen what this kind of intimidation has done to formerly democratic regimes around the world. But they will not intimidate us. We are a peaceful people, but we are not a fragile people. We will not be intimidated by thugs and killers. But we must back up our resolve with more than words. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Election Postponed to Preserve Democracy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.