DAILY POST COMMENT: 1066 and All That, Is History

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), August 5, 2004 | Go to article overview

DAILY POST COMMENT: 1066 and All That, Is History


A SURVEY, timed to advertise a new television history series, claims that a third of 16 to 34-year-olds questioned don't know that William the Conqueror won the Battle of Hastings, one-in-five believing it to have been Alexander the Great.

Almost a quarter of pensioners remain blissfully unaware that the Romans had, a while earlier, conquered Britain, while a third of all age groups think the Battle of Britain happened during some conflict other than World War II -- including 12% who took a stab in the dark at the Hundred Years War, some 600 years before.

Rather delightfully, 15% of 16 to 24-year-olds apparently think the Ulster Orangemen march to celebrate victory at Helmsdeep -- the fictional battle that marked the climax of the second part of JRR Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy.

They might just as well do, for all the relevance the 1690 Battle of the Boyne has to today's Northern Ireland except to perpetuate sectarian prejudice and hatred.

As for destroying the Spanish Armada, you can forget Sir Francis Drake. One-in-seven of 16 to 24-year-olds credit the victory to Horatio Hornblower, CS Forester's fictional hero; a fifth say Christopher Columbus, and 6% Gandalf, the wizard from Tolkien's fantasy novels.

In Tony Blair's Britain of ``education education education'', these results, if true, would offer a fairly damning guide to the way our taxes are being squandered. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

DAILY POST COMMENT: 1066 and All That, Is History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.