New Era University: Gearing Up towards a Glorious Era

Manila Bulletin, August 7, 2004 | Go to article overview

New Era University: Gearing Up towards a Glorious Era


Barely 10 months from now, New Era University will be commemorating its 30th Foundation Day. This occasion, dubbed "NEU Pearl Anniversary has just began to pre- occupy the academic community after it was launched during the Faculty and Staff General Assembly held recently at the University Hall. However, the fervor to uphold the institutions mission and vision and the lofty goal of becoming

one of the best learning institutions in the country, and perchance in the world, should not make anyone forget its humble roots.

HUMBLE BEGINNINGS

Beginning as the New Era Educational Institute (NEEI) in June 17, 1975, the school offered secondary education in a building purchased by the Iglesia ni Cristo in Echague, Quiapo, Manila. Twenty-three teachers and 466 students pioneered the schools operation.

On June 1977, NEEI was formally incorporated under Republic Act 1459 as a private non-stock, non-profi t educational institution aiming to develop academic excellence, professional responsibility, and social awareness founded on genuine Christian principles.

During the school year 1977-1978, NEEI also offered vocational and technical courses under the Non-Formal Education Program. In 2003, this was renamed the Center for Livelihood and Skills Training, offering a more vigorous life-long education to learners, young and old.

In 1978, the collegiate department opened in Diliman, Quezon City, occupying the third and fourth fl oors of the Evangelical College building. The fi rst and second levels served as the training center of the church for would-be ministers. Twelve collegiate courses were initially offered: AB Mass Communication, BS Psychology, BSBA Marketing, BSBA Accounting, BSBA Management, BSBA Banking and Finance, and two-year Junior Secretarial Course. In the field of engineering and technology, BS Civil Engineering, BS Electrical Engineering, BS Mechanical Engineering, BS Electronics and Communications Engineering were offered.

In 1981, NEEI assumed the name New Era College (NEC) after it was granted recognition by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports. In 1982, NEC held its fi rst commencement exercise and conferred the degree of Bachelor of Science (in Psychology, Industrial Education, and Business Administration) on twelve graduates.

The Graduate School was established during the school year 1983- 1984 offering the course Master of Arts in College teaching. The programs Bachelor of Elementary Education and Bachelor of Secondary Education also started that year. In 1984, NEC opened its Elementary Department and on May 10, 1985, Bro. Erano G. Manalo inaugurated the new and permament campus of New Era College along St. Joseph St., Milton Hills, Diliman, Quezon City. In view of the peace and order problems surrounding the vicinity of the Manila campus, the High School Department and Non-Formal Education Unit transferred to the new campus in Diliman. This brought together all the departments of the college under the roof of the new four-storey building. majestic buildings towering over 2.9hectares of land in Marawoy, Lipa City. On June 30, 1995, the college was granted university status by the Commission on Higher Education. The school was officially named New Era University.

Inspired by the attainment of university status and motivated by the challenge of excellence in education, New Era University submitted itself to voluntary accreditation. …

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