Democrats Howl at Party Hopping; Alexander's Timing Center of Storm

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 10, 2004 | Go to article overview

Democrats Howl at Party Hopping; Alexander's Timing Center of Storm


Byline: Charles Hurt, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Rep. Rodney Alexander's switch late Friday to the Republican Party brought swift and vitriolic responses among Democrats from the Bayou to the Beltway, including from his entire Washington staff that resigned in protest yesterday morning.

"He's a traitor," fumed Andrew Koneschusky of the Louisiana Democratic Party. "He betrayed the people who elected him to the U.S. Congress and the people who supported his re-election."

Particularly galling to Democrats was that the first-term lawmaker waited until 15 minutes before the state's filing deadline to switch his affiliation from Democrat to Republican, leaving Democrats no time to post strong opposition.

"A man of honor, as many before him have done, would have changed his party affiliation well before the filing deadline," said Mr. Alexander's former whip, Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland. "He would have had the courage to face a challenger and defend the failed policies promoted by his new party."

Democrats now must oust 12 Republicans in order to capture control of the House, a difficult task considering that political analysts have deemed only about 30 races to be competitive.

Mr. Alexander initially was registered to run for re-election as a Democrat in Louisiana's 5th Congressional District, where George W. Bush received 59 percent of the vote in the 2000 election. He had rebuffed entreaties to join the Republican Party earlier this year.

"It was an act of a person without honor or integrity," Mr. Hoyer said. "In my 24 years in Congress, I cannot recall a more deceitful, more calculated, more treacherous violation of trust - which Congressman Alexander sought and which he received - than what he had done over the past few days and months. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Democrats Howl at Party Hopping; Alexander's Timing Center of Storm
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.