Chalabi's Nephew Rejects Charges; Hints at Effects on Saddam's Prosecution

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 10, 2004 | Go to article overview

Chalabi's Nephew Rejects Charges; Hints at Effects on Saddam's Prosecution


Byline: Al Webb and David R. Sands, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Salem Chalabi, the head of Iraq's war-crimes tribunal, yesterday denounced legal charges brought against him and his uncle, Ahmed Chalabi, and warned that the accusations could undermine the prosecution of Saddam Hussein.

Both Chalabis vowed to return to Iraq to fight the charges, but Salem Chalabi said he needed security guarantees because his role overseeing Saddam's trial made him fear for his life.

"My life is threatened daily in Baghdad because of what I'm doing and who benefited out of this," the younger Mr. Chalabi told the British Broadcasting Corp.

"There may be an investigation [against me]," he said, "but the fact that it was leaked means that there is an element of a smear campaign against me and of trying to discredit the tribunal, which I think has happened now."

The chief investigative judge of Iraq's Central Criminal Court, who has feuded with both Chalabis in recent months, issued arrest warrants for the two during the weekend.

Salem Chalabi, a U.S.-educated lawyer, is accused of a role in the May 28 assassination of Haitham Fadhil, a senior Iraqi Finance Ministry official who had been investigating charges of corruption and theft involving the Iraqi National Congress (INC).

Ahmed Chalabi, the INC's leading figure and a close Pentagon ally in the run-up to the war last year, faces counterfeiting charges based on evidence uncovered in a raid of the INC's offices in Baghdad in May.

Analysts said the legal moves play into a murky power struggle involving the senior Mr. Chalabi and Iraqi Prime Minister Iyad Allawi - one in which Mr. Chalabi's increasingly close ties to Iran played a major part. Mr. Chalabi had been on a visit to Tehran when the arrest warrant was issued.

Bush administration officials, who have distanced themselves from Mr. Chalabi in recent months, insisted yesterday that the arrest warrants were an "internal Iraqi matter," according to State Department deputy spokesman J. Adam Ereli.

"This is not a question of past associations or friendships. This is a question of the Iraqi justice system at work," he said.

Mr. Ereli said he did not expect the case against Salem Chalabi to undermine the pending trial of Saddam.

The Saddam tribunal "is a question about government policies and institutions; it's not a question of personalities," he said.

But Ziad al-Khasawneh, one of Saddam's attorneys, told reporters in Jordan that the filing against Salem Chalabi was a "miracle from God" for his client.

"We have said time and again that the court was illegal and illegitimate, and now there's evidence for everyone: The court is headed by a murderer," he said.

The Los Angeles Times reported last week that Mr. …

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