Election Offers No Great Choices for Arab-Americans

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 2, 2004 | Go to article overview

Election Offers No Great Choices for Arab-Americans


Byline: Ray Hanania

You would think the presidential election is an easy choice for Arab- and Muslim-American voters. It's not.

President Bush is responsible for undermining Middle East peace, diluting the war on terrorism to achieve anti-Arab and anti-Muslim goals, and undermining civil rights in America.

So what else is new in American politics?

Some Arabs and Muslims may waste a vote on Ralph Nader, the self-promoting spoiler who helped weaken Al Gore's candidacy four years ago. But while Bush is anti-Arab, so is the Democratic challenger, Sen. John Kerry.

Once again, America's presidential election will not be about which candidate supports Israel, but rather which supports Israel more.

When he addressed Arab-Americans last year, Kerry expressed concerns about the wall, which Israel calls a "fence" and the timid American media refer to as "the barrier." Weeks later, battered by pro-Israel lobbies, Kerry did an about-face and declared support for the "fence."

Kerry also said Palestinian President Yasser Arafat should be isolated. He declared Palestinians have no right of return to lands taken from them by Israel in 1948. And he believes Israel should keep many settlements. So, what's the point of negotiating?

Running mate John Edwards also has taken a hard-right turn on the Middle East. I participated in a conference call with him last year, and he expressed "moderate" views. But that changed, too, and he agrees with Kerry.

But this could all just be campaign rhetoric to win votes. Kerry and Edwards must choose sides between Jewish-American voters, and Arab and Muslim voters. Look at their choices.

Florida is a key state with significant Jewish-American votes. Though Jewish-Americans have diverse views, they are better able to come together when Israel is at stake. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Election Offers No Great Choices for Arab-Americans
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.