Kerry-Edwards Fiscal Policy

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 17, 2004 | Go to article overview

Kerry-Edwards Fiscal Policy


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Kerry-Edwards presidential campaign recently issued a broad outline of its budget policy, but the Kerry-Edwards arithmetic hasn't improved on John Kerry's numbers during the primary campaign. The first sign that they are winging it came from their assertion that they would save $300 billion over 10 years by "eliminat[ing] unnecessary corporate welfare."

Are we to assume that John Kerry and John Edwards intend to maintain current levels of "necessary corporate welfare"? It is not that we doubt there is $30 billion per year of corporate welfare tucked away in tax loopholes and subsidies. And we share their belief that giving Sen. John McCain an ax to hack away at corporate welfare would be a good start. But wasn't Mr. McCain the one presidential candidate in memory who had the nerve to tell Iowans that the ethanol scam was a classic example of corporate welfare? And didn't Messrs. Kerry and Edwards embrace the ethanol rip-off in search of Iowa caucus votes? So, where's the testosterone?

Meanwhile, when Mr. Kerry unveiled his health-care plan in May 2003, it carried a 10-year price tag of $890 billion, according to an analysis by health-care economist Ken Thorpe. The latest price tag is a mere $653 billion. That was an amazing achievement, considering that the campaign also conveniently folded in 90 percent of its $300 billion proposal for mandatory veterans health care.

The Kerry-Edwards plan calls for adding 40,000 troops to the armed forces, but the net cost apparently will be zero because the troops will be paid for by "streamlining various large weapons programs," adopting a " 'systems of systems' approach to transformation, reducing total expenditures on missile defense and further reforming the acquisition process. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Kerry-Edwards Fiscal Policy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.