Negative by Nature

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 20, 2004 | Go to article overview

Negative by Nature


Byline: John McCaslin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Negative by nature

Turned off by the 2004 presidential campaign?

You might try turning off your television.

"If people believe campaigns are negative, it could well be due to the fact that the news coverage of political campaigns is more negative than the campaigns themselves," reveals William Benoit, a leading expert on presidential campaigns and communications professor at the University of Missouri at Columbia.

Mr. Benoit says as President Bush and Sen. John Kerry continue crisscrossing the country, and with one convention just ended and another one week away, the "media" have an abundance of political stories to cover.

Yet his new analysis shows that not only is press coverage more negative than the candidates' actual messages, but the majority of reporting is on the "horse race" and not on the candidates' policy or character.

Monitoring affront

Ralph Nader isn't alone in the presidential contender wings - or so we now hear.

We wrote earlier this week that a group of congressmen, led by Texas Republican Rep. Lamar Smith, are outraged that the Bush administration has invited an international team of election monitors to observe the 2004 presidential election. Those lawmakers now have an ally.

"It is an affront to our sovereignty and independence as a nation to allow so-called 'international election monitors' to observe or in any way interfere with our constitutionally mandated election process," says Michael A. Peroutka, the Constitution Party candidate for president.

He says inviting members of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe "to monitor our elections shows just how committed to an internationalist agenda are the candidates from the Democrat and Republican parties."

Anti-war wing

There should be plenty of excitement outside Madison Square Garden during the upcoming Republican National Convention, as New York City gears up for anti-war protests unlike any seen in the Big Apple since the 1982 March for Nuclear Disarmament.

Activists with the Tucson Radical Activist Network and Food Not Bombs (some of their members say they were tagged by the FBI in recent weeks) are planning protests and "street theater" under the direction of Tucson, Ariz., resident Keith McHenry, co-founder of the latter bunch.

In fact, he is predicting one of the largest anti-war protests ever held in the United States.

It's a party

Needless to say, people are easily bored by politics. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Negative by Nature
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.