Correctional Facility Tours

Corrections Today, August 2004 | Go to article overview

Correctional Facility Tours


Tuesday, August 3, 2004 * 1:15 p.m.-6:00 p.m.

The American Correctional Association extends a cordial invitation to attendees of the 134th Congress of Correction to observe the day-to-day activities of various types of correctional facilities in Illinois, organized by the Illinois Host Committee. Attendees will be enlightened as they discover what's happening behind the scenes at these facilities. When you arrive in Chicago, be sure to register at the ACA registration area in the Navy Pier Chicago Convention Center. But you must hurry, because these tours are always popular and space fills quickly. Transportation to and from the facilities is provided.

COOK COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS (CCDOC)

The Cook County Department of Corrections (CCDOC) is the largest single-site detention facility in the country. It is also the American Correctional Association's largest accredited detention facility. Located on 97 acres in southwest Chicago, the CCDOC annually processes more than 100,000 inmates. Included in the compound are Illinois's second largest kitchen (preparing more than 33,000 meals daily) and Cermak Health Services (the largest single-site correctional health care service in the country to have full accreditation by the National Commission on Correctional Health Care).

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Proposed tour buildings include Divisions One, Five and Eleven.

ILLINOIS YOUTH CENTER-WARRENVILLE

Illinois Youth Center (IYC)-Warrenville is the reception and classification center for all juvenile females committed to the Illinois Department of Corrections (IDOC). IYC-Warrenville is Level 1 maximum-security facility. Prior to its incorporation into the Division of Women and Family Services, IYC-Warrenville held both juvenile males and females committed to IDOC. IYC-Warrenville was the first co-educational juvenile training school in the nation accredited by the American Correctional Association and was re-accredited in August 1997.

METROPOLITAN CORRECTIONAL CENTER

Opened in 1975, the Metropolitan Correctional Center (MCC) is a unique high-rise triangular jail structure designed to house federal prisoners of all custody classifications safely and securely in the south loop section of downtown Chicago. The facility provides mainly pretrial detention services for the Northern District of Illinois Federal Courts. The MCC can house up to 694 adult males and 40 adult females. Each year more than 10,000 prisoners are processed in or out of the facility. The facility is staffed by a complement of up to 240 full-time individuals and more than 100 community volunteers who provide a variety of valuable services. Program activities for inmates include GED and adult literacy, ESL, drug education, parenting and indoor/outdoor recreation.

THE SAFER FOUNDATION NORTH LAWNDALE ADULT TRANSITION CENTER

The Safer Foundation opened North Lawndale Adult Transition Center in June 2000 under contract with the Illinois Department of Corrections. The center is a 200-bed facility located on the west side of Chicago. North Lawndale adopted a philosophy that "good programming is good security and good security is good programming." The facility and other programs are designed for offenders in work-release status transitioning from secure custody and preparing for parole. Safer Foundation's mission is to reduce recidivism. Efforts to reduce recidivism begin the first day a resident arrives. The resident receives an education and substance assessment and an Individualized Program Contract establishing goals.

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NORTHERN RECEPTION AND CLASSIFICATION CENTER

The new Northern Reception and Classification (R & C) Center is adjacent to Stateville Correctional Center in Joliet, Illinois. …

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