The Olympics: 2004: I WANT TO RUN IT; EXCLUSIVE BRAVE PAULA PINS HOPES ON 10,000M Marathon Star Targets 'Greatest Comeback in History'

The Mirror (London, England), August 25, 2004 | Go to article overview

The Olympics: 2004: I WANT TO RUN IT; EXCLUSIVE BRAVE PAULA PINS HOPES ON 10,000M Marathon Star Targets 'Greatest Comeback in History'


Byline: JOHN CROSS and JANE RIDLEY

PAULA Radcliffe says she wants to go for gold in the Olympic 10,000 metres final on Friday.

She is desperate to make up for her failure to finish the marathon in which she was expected to triumph.

After a tearful and traumatic three days, she has told friends: "I'll run."

But the final decision could now depend on medical opinion.

The 30-year-old British star saw a doctor yesterday and was "sleeping on his advice" before making a decision today on whether or not to run.

But as she prepared for what could be the biggest sporting comeback in history, her parents delivered their support.

Her father Peter told the Daily Mirror: "Paula will bounce back. She is a very determined character and whatever she decides, we'll back her."

Paula is already feeling fitter and stronger following her gruelling marathon ordeal in the searing heat of Athens.

UK Athletics coaching supremo Max Jones revealed: "She is being monitored daily, she is getting better daily."

And privately she has resolved to run the race of her life in pursuit of the medal she craves - both for herself and Team GB.

Even if she misses out on glory, the girl from Bedford wants to prove that she has the grit to cross the finishing line.

Last night British athletes backed Paula to bounce back in the 10,000 metres.

Olympic gold medallist Kelly Holmes said: "I'm sure if she is fit enough, she will go for the 10,000 and I'm sure everybody in Britain would like to see her do it."

And former Commonwealth Games high jump champion Dalton Grant added: "It is normal for an athlete to have a hiccup. If she is prepared to go out and put her neck on the line she should go for it."

Yesterday her mother Pat, 56, described the anguish of watching her daughter break down and collapse on Sunday in what should have been the crowning event of her brilliant career.

"We are desperately proud of Paula but devastated things didn't turn out how she'd hoped," said Pat, speaking at her hotel near the Marathon start line, 26 miles east of Athens.

"My first instinct was to dash out and wrap my arms around my little girl.

"It was an awful thing for a mother to see her daughter suffering like that. We were extremely upset and worried.

"The feeling of helplessness was horrendous. We didn't know where she was for what seemed like ages."

Paula's family had gathered at the finish line at the Panathinaiko Stadium and watched the giant screen.

As they saw her faltering, they rushed to leave but officials wouldn't let them out. "It was terrible.

"We felt so powerless," said Pat. Peter and his son-in-law Gary Lough, who also coaches Paula, frantically tried to find out what was happening. The screen wasn't telling us anything," said the businessman. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Olympics: 2004: I WANT TO RUN IT; EXCLUSIVE BRAVE PAULA PINS HOPES ON 10,000M Marathon Star Targets 'Greatest Comeback in History'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.