Cultural Diversity in USDA's Land-Grant System

Human Ecology, June 2004 | Go to article overview

Cultural Diversity in USDA's Land-Grant System


In 1998 the Change Agent States for Diversity Consortium (CASD) was established to build the capacity of the Cooperative Extension System and its research and university partners to function inclusively and effectively in a multicultural world, setting standards and implementing a vision for healthy, thriving, and productive communities.

"Organizationally, diversity must be integrated into everything we do," says Linda Couchon, a diversity specialist with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Chemung County. "At the same time we have to take the opportunity to think about diversity as an issue and content area requiring new competencies, expanded perspectives, and creative processes. Much of the journey is about internal work, such as becoming aware of the cultural assumptions we bring to our own organization and to the programs we offer."

Couchon says that knowing the right questions to ask is key to raising awareness. Is the content of a parenting program designed for white parents relevant to a primarily black audience? Is it respectful to Native Americans to hold meetings in a church? Are all staff members in an office equally aware of the unspoken cultural norms upon which promotions are based?

"People need to spend time thinking about these," she says, "as well as getting to know and building trust with members of the diverse audiences they serve."

CASD is a partnership of Cooperative Extension Systems in seven states: North Dakota, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Arizona, Colorado, North Carolina, and New York. Each has a Diversity Catalyst Team to lead and model institutional change toward becoming a multicultural extension organization. Couchon coordinates New York's 16-member team. Recent Catalyst Team programs have addressed topics as varied as creating a respectful workplace, marketing with diversity in mind, promoting environmental rights, exploring cultural perspectives on parenting, understanding Native American land claims, and applying tools to assist in compliance with affirmative action regulations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cultural Diversity in USDA's Land-Grant System
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.