Beta Blockers, Depression: Breaking the Link

By Fackelmann, Kathy A. | Science News, April 4, 1992 | Go to article overview

Beta Blockers, Depression: Breaking the Link


Fackelmann, Kathy A., Science News


Beta blockers, a class of drugs frequently prescribed for high blood pressure, have been linked with depression in the past. But a new epidemiologic study may force doctors to reexamine the evidence linking beta blockers with the blues.

In general, physicians hail these drugs as a crucial weapon in the fight against hypertension, migraine headaches, certain forms of violent behavior and even stage fright. Yet during the 1980s, several scientific reports suggested beta blockers might cause clinical depression, a very serious disorder characterized by hopelessness and suicidal tendencies.

Now, Roselie A. Bright of the Food and Drug Administration in Rockville, Md., and Daniel E. Everitt of the Presbyterian Medical Center in Philadelphia offer evidence that may clear the shadow of depression from the beta blocker story.

Using Medicaid reimbursement claims filed in New Jersey from July 1980 to December 1983, the team identified 4,302 people who had at least one sign of serious depression, such as the use of antidepressant drugs or electroconvulsive shock therapy. The researchers then matched these individuals with 8,604 controls whose claim forms showed no signs of depression.

When the team went back and studied the claim forms for prescription drugs, they discovered an association between beta blockers and depression. Depressed individuals were 1.45 times more likely than controls to have taken beta blockers for at least a year before their mood disorder surfaced.

That seemed to lend credence to the earlier reports. But when the researchers added so-called confounding factors to their statistical analysis, the link between depression and beta blockers dissolved. The crucial factors were frequent use of prescription drugs, frequent trips to the doctor's office and repeated use of anti-anxiety drugs called benzodiazepines, the team reports in the April 1 JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Beta Blockers, Depression: Breaking the Link
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.