Fighting Fit

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), August 30, 2004 | Go to article overview

Fighting Fit


Byline: By David Ashdown

All too often we measure our physical health and wellbeing in terms of weight loss. This week I would like to explain just why this is not ideal and exactly how the scales may be holding you back.

Most of us exercise to lose weight; we modify our diets, wardrobes and lifestyle around this aim and jump on the bathroom scales each morning ( before breakfast, obviousl () just to see if we have lost a little more. We take our shoes off, remove jewellery and watches in the hope of shedding a few grams and all the while we are missing the point; scales don't tell you if you're getting healthier, or if you're reducing your cholesterol count or high blood pressure, they just give you your weight and nothing more.

"Body composition" refers to the measurement of our fat-versus-muscle ratio (ie, exactly what our bodies are made up of). A tiny electrical current is channelled through the body to determine how much of our total body weight is stored fat, this reading can be used far more effectively to see any changes that exercise and diet promote.

Essentially, when we say we would like to lose weight we mean reduce our body fat percentage, we want slimmer waists, leaner limbs and a more flattering shape. "Weight loss" has become the incorrect term for this aim. Using regular scales to monitor any change can be counterproductive as lean muscle tissue is far denser than adipose (fatty) tissue and therefore a smaller amount of muscle is equal in weight to a larger-sized portion of fat. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Fighting Fit
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.