Brave New Leadership: With Community College Presidents Retiring Left and Right, What's an Open-Access Institution to Do? Leadership Programs Just Might Be the Answer

By Bagnato, Kristin | Black Issues in Higher Education, August 26, 2004 | Go to article overview

Brave New Leadership: With Community College Presidents Retiring Left and Right, What's an Open-Access Institution to Do? Leadership Programs Just Might Be the Answer


Bagnato, Kristin, Black Issues in Higher Education


As community colleges grapple with some of the most pressing issues they've ever faced--teacher shortages, swelling enrollments and budget cuts, to name a few--those at the helm of the institutions are critical in determining the schools' success. Meanwhile, with scores of baby boomers on the verge of retiring, community college leadership also will be facing a shortage. Such challenges, educators say, only underscore the need for more and better community college leaders and programs to train them.

A variety of programs are stepping up to fill the institutional knowledge vacuum created by retiring presidents, and vice presidents who would normally be tapped to fill the high posts also are retiring, according to a 2001 study by the American Association of Community Colleges.

From residential two-year pro grams, to Internet-based teleclasses, to customized curriculum paths, doctoral and master's degree programs in community college leadership are the next wave of career education for the community college professional. And if a degree-granting course isn't quite on the radar screen, less formal weeklong or daylong seminars can be a good way to get your feet wet in the leadership arena.

These programs teach everything from financial and budgeting strategies to interpersonal skills, all with the community college in mind. Not only is completing one of these programs a good way to get a job--soon it may be the only way to find a position in the upper echelons of community college management.

"You can still find some searches where they don't require a doctorate," says Dr. John E. Roueche, president of the Community College Leadership Program at The University of Texas at Austin, "but the overwhelming majority would require at least an advanced degree in the field."

THAT WAS THEN

The 1960s and 1970s were boom years for community colleges. With funding at a high, many of today's retiring leaders were drown into the community college movement and found their career paths.

"Community colleges are a social miracle for this country," says Dr. Terry O'Banion, president of Walden University's leadership program and president emeritus of the League for Innovation in the Community College. With the doors to education open wide for many who would not have otherwise had access to higher education, two-year schools have helped to level the unbalanced playing field.

Now those leaders who were so motivated and supported are retiring, and with them goes decades of institutional knowledge and ability. One way they're making sure to pass on their knowledge is by heading up or joining the faculty of community college leadership programs. Look at any faculty list, and you'll see familiar names across the board.

"What is clear to me is that this profession has a culture of development," says Dr. Mark D. Milliron, president and chief executive officer of the League for Innovation in the Community College.

A LITTLE OF THIS, A LITTLE OF THAT

At the University of Texas at Austin, the renowned community college leadership program is celebrating its 60th anniversary this year. Its two-year residential program has graduated more women and minority students than any other, Roueche said, and not only does it seek out the talented; it places them, too.

The highly competitive CCLP is an immersion program that keeps students, faculty and guest lecturers up-close and personal, creating a bonded "block" that not only provides support during the program, but is a source of professional support and networking once the program ends.

That support isn't unique to Texas' program. All the programs emphasize teambuilding and peer-group support, as is evidenced by the common use of cohorts--a group of students who go through the program together. At Texas that group pretty much eats, sleeps and breathes together, going through each section of the program as a unit, and sharing time not only with other students, but also with faculty. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Brave New Leadership: With Community College Presidents Retiring Left and Right, What's an Open-Access Institution to Do? Leadership Programs Just Might Be the Answer
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.