FTAA: Forced to Accept Aliens: Despite One Opinion Poll after Another Showing That Americans Overwhelmingly Support Tighter Immigration Policies, FTAA Proponents Intend to Erase Our Nation's Borders

By Jasper, William F. | The New American, September 6, 2004 | Go to article overview

FTAA: Forced to Accept Aliens: Despite One Opinion Poll after Another Showing That Americans Overwhelmingly Support Tighter Immigration Policies, FTAA Proponents Intend to Erase Our Nation's Borders


Jasper, William F., The New American


When it comes to accepting immigrants, the United States of America has been more generous than any other nation in the world. In fact, for many years we have accepted more immigrants than have all other countries of the world combined. In addition to opening our doors to this steady influx of immigrants and refugees, we also have been extremely casual about allowing millions of aliens to violate our borders and settle here illegally. This is now causing us major economic, social, political and national security problems.

Imagine then the catastrophic consequences of further swamping our already overwhelmed borders with five, ten or twenty times the number of aliens--legal and illegal--that now annually flood our shores. That is precisely what awaits us, if Congress adopts the proposed Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA).

If the American voters had the barest inkling of the immigration avalanche that the FTAA would start, they would be sweeping from office every politician who breathed even the slightest hint of support for this misnamed and misbegotten scheme. Over the past three decades, opinion poll after opinion poll has shown that Americans overwhelmingly support stronger border security and greater restrictions on immigration.

A national RoperASW poll released in April 2003 reported that 85 percent of American saw illegal immigration as a "serious problem." The same poll found similar percentages favoring stronger border enforcement and an overall reduction of U.S. immigration levels. Even Hispanics lean strongly in this direction. The Hispanic business magazine Poder reported in its January 2004 issue that a recent poll it had commissioned found 56 percent of U.S. Hispanics favoring "tougher immigration [controls] in light of security concerns."

Pro FTAA politicians in both major parties know that security concerns heightened by the 9-11 terrorist attacks have combined with the U.S. economic downturn and rising unemployment to make immigration--both legal and illegal--an even hotter topic than ever. That is why they are doing everything possible to keep the "open borders" feature of the FTAA as hidden as possible.

The dirty secret that the FTAA proponents can't afford to leak out too soon is this: A fully implemented FTAA would eliminate sovereign borders between the countries of the Western Hemisphere. The FTAA architects call for full economic and political "integration and convergence," along the lines already adopted by the countries of the European Union.

In case you haven't noticed, even our legal terminology is gradually being changed to resemble the EU model. Increasingly, government officials, academics and the media are using the terms "migrant" and "migration" rather than "immigrant" and "immigration." As a U.S. citizen, you have the right to migrate freely to any part of our country, from, say, Ohio to Florida, Oregon or Alaska.

Similarly, if we allow the FTAA to be put into effect, we should soon expect tens of millions of people--from Canada to Mexico to Haiti to Brazil and Argentina--to "migrate" here. And they would claim a legal right to do so. In fact, the Latin American Solidarity Coalition charges that "current U.S. anti-immigration policies and laws violate many of the provisions of the United Nation's Universal Declaration of Human Rights."

The Elephant Under the Doily

The immigration/migration juggernaut headed our way was the great unspoken issue at the November 2003 Summit of the Americas in Miami. The South Florida Sun-Sentinel noted in an article about the summit that "immigration policy is strictly off the menu." "Nobody's lobbying [on immigration] mainly because most people realize that it's something that should be brought in at least gradually," Max Castro, a left-wing writer and researcher at the University of Miami's North-South Center, told the Sun-Sentinel. "If you made that the first item on the agenda it would probably torpedo the whole thing," said Dr. …

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