Flintoff Rises above "The Welfare State of Mind" That Bedevilled English Cricket

By Howe, Darcus | New Statesman (1996), August 23, 2004 | Go to article overview

Flintoff Rises above "The Welfare State of Mind" That Bedevilled English Cricket


Howe, Darcus, New Statesman (1996)


The nickname that most people use for the young Lancashire and England cricketer Andrew Flintoff is Freddie. I call him Flinty. Whenever he walks in to bat or the captain gives him the ball to bowl, a frisson runs through the entire ground. With him in action, every single spectator expects something extraordinary to happen and, during the current Test series against the West Indies, it almost invariably does. This is a very rare phenomenon in the world of cricket.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Only recently, organisers of the game were lamenting the absence of huge crowds at Test matches. The five-day match, it was thought, was too long for most potential audiences. Flinty has transformed all that. I went to Edgbaston in Birmingham last month for the third day of the second Test, where I was interviewed on BBC Radio's Test Match Special. The ground was packed to capacity, as it was throughout the match.

When Flinty came on to bowl, you could see, with the naked eye, the physical readjustments of spectators in their seats. Brian Lara, the greatest batsman of modern times, was facing him and looked set for another century. But Flinty dismissed him on 95. He has now got him out several times, including twice, for very low scores, in the third Test at Old Trafford in Manchester. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Flintoff Rises above "The Welfare State of Mind" That Bedevilled English Cricket
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.