Barton's Lifetime of Compassion

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 18, 2004 | Go to article overview

Barton's Lifetime of Compassion


Byline: Peter Cliffe, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

She was a little spinster with untidy hair, always plainly dressed and often painfully shy, but her outward appearance deceived. Clara Barton was a woman with an unshakable determination who showed unflinching courage when exposed to great danger. Known as the "angel of the battlefield," she was adored by the Union troops whose welfare was her sole concern.

Clarissa Harlowe Barton was born on Dec. 25, 1821, in North Oxford, Mass., the only daughter and youngest of five children of Stephen Barton and the former Sarah Stone. Her schooling was much interrupted by her need to nurse her brother David, who had been badly hurt in a fall from a barn roof at the family home.

In 1850, she enrolled at the Liberal Institute in Clinton, near Utica, N.Y., and two years later, she became a teacher in Highstown, N.J. When she opened a school in Bordenstown, N.J., beside the Delaware River, it prospered, but she took offense when a male superintendent was placed over her, and she left.

Until then, she had known only small towns, but in 1854, she moved to the District, where she found dull but remarkably well-paid (for a woman) work as a clerk in the Patent Office. Apparently, her handwriting was of a high standard, essential for the documents she was required to copy. She was there for three years, and then the war took her, by her own decision, out of secure employment and obscurity. Although she was no seeker of publicity, she was to become famous.

Her determination to do all she could to help wounded soldiers was fired when she started to aid men of the 6th Massachusetts Regiment - some of whom she knew - who had been injured, some badly, in the vicious Baltimore riot of April 19, 1861. The secessionist mob had killed four of the soldiers.

She began a self-appointed task of obtaining the names and addresses of the wounded and writing to their families. This was a practice she would continue and that would win her respect and affection.

She never fell afoul of the hard-pressed Sanitary Commission, which not only approved of her work, but lent her support as well. She had no nursing experience; as a nurse, she probably would have clashed with the redoubtable Dorothea Dix.

Barton began to receive packages that were intended for individual soldiers, and she made sure they got them. This led to her accumulating vital medical supplies that were desperately needed. It also meant she would have to visit the battle zones.

After the Battle of Cedar Mountain on Aug. 9, 1862, she offered her wagonload of supplies. It took much persuasion and some tears before she was permitted to visit the makeshift military hospital at Culpeper, where her provisions were received with surprise and tremendous relief. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Barton's Lifetime of Compassion
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.