Decent Housing Is Global Goal; U.N. Agency Partners with Habitat Group

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 20, 2004 | Go to article overview

Decent Housing Is Global Goal; U.N. Agency Partners with Habitat Group


Byline: Marion Baillot, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Between soaring interest rates and a monthly income of less than $200, the only shelter the Verduguez family could afford in Cochabamba, Bolivia, was two tiny rooms in a run-down adobe-block house.

The walls are cracked, the stucco is falling and water leaks through the roof when it rains. Romulo, 45, and Adela, 41, struggle to find enough room for their six children, ages 3 to 21, to sleep.

"With no bathroom in the house, our family has to go down the street to public toilets and showers shared by 80 other people. Everybody pays 32 cents each time to use the facilities. Water from the public system is available only once a week," said Mr. Romulo.

For many people around the world, finding decent housing remains a challenge.

An estimated quarter of humankind - more than 1 billion people - live in substandard housing or have no home at all. Families are trapped in a daily struggle to survive amid unpleasant, often inhuman conditions.

Last week in Barcelona, delegates to the World Urban Forum took a first step toward addressing the problem. Representatives of Habitat for Humanity International, a private, nonprofit organization, and the U.N. Human Settlements Program (U.N.-Habitat) signed an agreement to combine their efforts to improve housing for the poor and reconstruction after disasters.

The purpose of the partnership is to pool the expertise and resources of the two organizations in the pursuit of clearly established goals, officials of Habitat for Humanity said during interviews in Washington.

The two groups already work together unofficially, but hope formalizing the relationship will make their work more effective.

"We aim to place housing for low-income people at the center of the international development agenda by addressing issues that perpetuate the cycle of generation after generation living in poverty housing," said Tom Jones, vice president of Habitat for Humanity.

The Agreement of Cooperation calls for the two groups to focus their efforts on goals that include:

* Elevating housing issues in the international policy arena.

* Providing sanitary, humane and decent conditions in slum and post-conflict areas.

* Making needed infrastructure improvements in war-torn areas.

* Helping local groups better address housing problems in their own areas.

* Collaborating on studies and data collection.

* Increasing global awareness of substandard living conditions through international training sessions, conferences and workshops.

One of the workshops in Barcelona last week, "Housing for All in the New Millennium," was dedicated to the study of global housing policy and advocacy. The goal is to develop an international housing coalition involving major international organizations like the World Bank.

Poverty housing is a bigger problem than most people realize, Kathleen Moore, director of external affairs at Habitat for Humanity, said.

"Housing has to be a major aspect of the policies of national leaders, administrations and international organizations, because it doesn't only stand at the basis of families, but also at the basis of our communities and nations," she said.

Tracy Kaufman, research associate with the National Low Income Housing Coalition, agreed. "Safe, affordable housing is a basic necessity for every family. Without a decent place to live, people cannot be productive members of society, children cannot learn and families cannot thrive," she said.

Recent studies show that the quality of housing is linked to health, educational, social and economic levels. That's why "slums cannot simply be considered as an unfortunate consequence of urban poverty, but need to be treated as a major issue," Mrs. Moore said.

A U.N.-Habitat report said: "The positive aspects of globalization, among which are greater longevity, increased literacy, lower infant mortality and wider access to infrastructure and social services, mask the unfortunate truth that these benefits are not being shared equally. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Decent Housing Is Global Goal; U.N. Agency Partners with Habitat Group
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.