Buried in a Coffin Lined with Lead, the Most Radioactive Man on the Planet; the Nuclear Scientist Injected with 'Safe' Plutonium

Daily Mail (London), September 15, 2004 | Go to article overview

Buried in a Coffin Lined with Lead, the Most Radioactive Man on the Planet; the Nuclear Scientist Injected with 'Safe' Plutonium


Byline: DAWN THOMPSON

HE described himself as the 'most radioactive man on the planet' after volunteering to be injected with plutonium in an extraordinary experiment.

Dr Eric Voice offered himself as a human guinea pig to disprove the generally held belief that plutonium was one of the most dangerous substances in the world.

He was so convinced it was completely harmless that he even agreed to inhale it straight into his lungs to test its effect on the body.

After the tests the nuclear scientist lived in good health until he became ill with motor neurone disease. Dr Voice died on Sunday aged 80.

He will now, reportedly, be buried in a lead-lined coffin.

During the 1990s, Dr Voice took part in a series of experiments, believing the plutonium - which would emit radiation for millions of years - would have no effect on his health.

The tests were carried out to assess the effect of plutonium on workers at a nuclear plant and those living nearby in the event of a nuclear disaster.

Dr Voice, who took part in the tests at the UK Atomic Energy Authority's base at Harwell in Oxfordshire, said the trials were about the nuclear industry's 'duty' to protect workers' safety.

After being injected with plutonium in 1997, he declared himself to be perfectly well.

He said: ' There is no evidence that any human on earth has suffered in health from plutonium and I have no adverse effects. …

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