News Focus: Children Booking Up Their Ideas.! SCHOOL PLAYS ITS PART IN KEEPING READING in an Age Dominated by Computers, Education Experts Feared Books Would Be Left Gathering Dust on the Shelves. but the Combined Efforts of Teachers, Classroom Assistants, Volunteers, Parents - and Pupils - at Wychall Primary School in Northfield, Are Ensuring That Reading Is as Popular as Ever, Reports DIANE PARKES. AN INTERESTING PASTIME FOR PUPILS

Birmingham Evening Mail (England), September 21, 2004 | Go to article overview

News Focus: Children Booking Up Their Ideas.! SCHOOL PLAYS ITS PART IN KEEPING READING in an Age Dominated by Computers, Education Experts Feared Books Would Be Left Gathering Dust on the Shelves. but the Combined Efforts of Teachers, Classroom Assistants, Volunteers, Parents - and Pupils - at Wychall Primary School in Northfield, Are Ensuring That Reading Is as Popular as Ever, Reports DIANE PARKES. AN INTERESTING PASTIME FOR PUPILS


Byline: DIANE PARKES

BOOKS are piled high on every shelf. Children are snuggled in soft and comfortable seats, turning the pages of the latest deliveries.

Surrounding them is a colourful jungle mural with a green tree reaching up to the ceiling, a bear looking out at the readers and monkeys and birds swinging in the trees.

This is one of Wychall Primary School's libraries and its very purpose is to offer youngsters somewhere that is fun, bright and cheerful in which to read. The school's literacy programme aims to encourage children to read in class, during their lunch breaks and to take books home.

And youngsters at the school are brimming over with enthusiasm for the task. Popular choices are Harry Potter, Roald Dahl, J R R Tolkien and anything which goes bump in the night.

Every class ends with a group reading so children are introduced to listening skills,sharing stories and concentration skills.

Seven-yearold Jamie Gardener is enjoying RoaldDahl's George's Marvellous Medicine in his class. 'Our teacher puts on all the funny voices - it makes us laugh,' he says. 'It is a good story.'

And the tactic is paying off as Jamie also spends time at home reading books with his mum.

Eight-year-old Dominic Brown is also a fan of George. 'I like scary stories and George's Marvellous Medicine because it is funny,' he says. 'I like to read. I like fiction and non-fiction - I like to read sport and football. 'I don't know what you would do if you couldn't read at all.'

Teachers are also using the latest technology to help children's own reading skills. In class they use interactive white boards to draw attention to certain parts of the book or to encourage children to work with words.

Michael Green, aged eight, says: 'We use the interactive white board to play games and guess the words. The teacher covers up the word and we have to guess what it is. We know because we have read the books before.'

This fun approach ensures Michael enjoys reading.

'I like scary books - things with zombies,' he says.

Wychall runs a number of schemes to encourage young readers. One such is a mentoring scheme from which SaraAnne Mills Bricknell, aged 11, has benefited. 'The mentorscome once a week and we spend about 20 minutes on a book,' she says. 'I also have to read a chapter a week and sometimes I write a page about it. We are reading Roald Dahl's Matilda.'

Sara-Anne also loves to read in her spare time. 'I like horror and adventures. I read Lord of the Rings, the adult version. It took about four months and I thought it was better than the film,' she says.

Ten-year-old Braden Allchurch says he often browses on the school's bookshelves.

'I use the libraries at the school, there is a good collection. I like adventures,' he says. 'I read the first Harry Potter and have just read a book called The Iron Man.

'If I wrote a book it would be an adventure with a hero and a baddy, they are the best ones.' Claire Griffiths, aged eight, is also a fan of the school libraries. 'I read books at home if I take them from the library,' he says. 'It wouldn't be fun if you couldn't read. I like fairy stories. I like The Secret Tree which is about a tree which leads to other lands. I also like scary stories and unusual stories.'

And parents also have a huge role to play in encouraging their children to enjoy books. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

News Focus: Children Booking Up Their Ideas.! SCHOOL PLAYS ITS PART IN KEEPING READING in an Age Dominated by Computers, Education Experts Feared Books Would Be Left Gathering Dust on the Shelves. but the Combined Efforts of Teachers, Classroom Assistants, Volunteers, Parents - and Pupils - at Wychall Primary School in Northfield, Are Ensuring That Reading Is as Popular as Ever, Reports DIANE PARKES. AN INTERESTING PASTIME FOR PUPILS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.