Blind Date; Every Week We Give a Singleton the Chance to Pick a Date and Then Send the Couple out. Then We Invite Them Back to Tell Us How They Got On

The Evening Standard (London, England), September 23, 2004 | Go to article overview

Blind Date; Every Week We Give a Singleton the Chance to Pick a Date and Then Send the Couple out. Then We Invite Them Back to Tell Us How They Got On


Byline: ALEX MATTIS

Liz, 27, a teacher from Stoke Newington

Star sign: Virgo

I absolutely love my job. I teach media studies at a sixth-form college and find it interesting and fun. I've been in fits of laughter before now. It's rewarding, too. I love getting to know the students, and when they do well I'm really proud of them.

Don't get me wrong, it's hard work and stressful, and I'll never earn enough to buy a house in London, but I wouldn't change it.

I live in Stoke Newington with my friend Bruna. The flat is a lovely Victorian conversion that belongs to her. My road stretches between Stoke Newington, which is quite trendy, and Hackney, which is cheap and cheerful.

I once asked my best friend to describe me. She said I was friendly, outgoing and willing to try new things. I think this is probably even truer these days - teaching gives you confidence.

I love meeting new people and trying new places. People would probably also describe me as bossy, but in a good way, I hope.

I'm taking part in Blind Date because, as I said, I'm up for anything. My ideal date would be with someone down to earth who doesn't take himself too seriously or try too hard. We'd meet in a pub, have a few drinks, then go on to a late bar to chat.

I love clubbing, so that would be a possibility, too.

Hopefully it won't be as bad as one date I had. I met a guy in a nightclub when I lived in Manchester. We met up again and it was awful. He had nothing to say for himself and did a sort of Beavis And Butthead laugh at everything I said. You can imagine the awkward silences. I felt it was rude just to go home, so I decided to get drunk to make it more bearable. The funniest thing was that he sent me a text two days later saying he'd really enjoyed himself and that we should do it again.

this week"s candidates

John, 26

Star sign: Capricorn.

Lives: I share a house in

Stratford.

Job: Designer and creative.

Salary: If you care about my

wallet, I"m unlikely to care

about you.

Car: In Canada, a "66 Jaguar E-Type.

In London, public transport and pedal

power are preferable.

Interests: Art, sport and travel.

Favourite film: Gladiatoror

The Thomas Crown Affair.

Book: Anything by Michael Moore.

Song: U2"s "With Or

Without You".

Personal style: Combats

and T-shirt.

Vices: I adore a drink. And

I have the strangest thing

for Bombay mix.

Dating history: Having come

from Canada I find that

women here are quite reserved

and surprised when a man acts in

a gentlemanly manner.

Ideal partner: She would be

independent and intelligent. It would be

a bonus if she was sporty and cared

about her appearance.

Kevin, 27

Star sign: Taurus.

Lives: Angel.

Job: Sales executive.

Salary: Enough to pay

the bills and have a

good time.

Car: No car yet, I"m saving for a

motorbike.

Interests: Movies, music, DJing,

dancing, the gym, having fun,

meeting people.

Favourite film: Invasion Of The Body

Snatchers(the 1978 version).

Book: To Kill A Mockingbirdby Harper

Lee. They don"t write them like

that any more.

Song: "California Soul" by

Marlena Shaw.

Personal style: Lenny

Kravitz meets Jay Kay.

Vices: Can be stubborn and

too talkative.

Dating history: Two previous

long-term relationships.

Ideal partner: Someone friendly and

outgoing who knows how to enjoy

everything that life has to offer. The

kind of girl who"s equally happy to go

out to a few bars or have a cosy night

on the sofa with a bottle of red wine. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Blind Date; Every Week We Give a Singleton the Chance to Pick a Date and Then Send the Couple out. Then We Invite Them Back to Tell Us How They Got On
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.