United Nations Needs Streamlining

By Drinan, Robert F. | National Catholic Reporter, September 10, 2004 | Go to article overview

United Nations Needs Streamlining


Drinan, Robert F., National Catholic Reporter


As a member of the Council to the United Nations Association, I spent two days recently consulting at the United Nations in New York. The secretary general, Kofi Annan, spoke at dinner reminding the 60-member group of the complexities of the 191 nations (192 if one includes the Holy See) that make up the United Nations.

The association has existed for some 40 years, urging, exhorting and inspiring the United Nations to streamline its outdated and ineffective structures. The obsolete mechanisms of the United Nations are self-evident. There is no reason why the victors in a war that ended in 1945 should be the five supreme rulers of an organization that embraces 6.1 billion persons alive today. Nor should a tiny nation like Togo have a vote equivalent to that cast

The United Nations Association and the World Federalists have been advocating the reform of the United Nations for many years. But a visit of 36 hours at the United Nations makes vivid the realization that it cannot be reformed without the active leadership of the United States. That leadership is nowhere in sight. Indeed it is clear in talking to the leaders of the United Nations that the United States is the elephant in the parlor. The United States has openly defied the United Nations in its war in Iraq. It has also aggressively opposed the development of the International Criminal Court, which would be a permanent Nuremberg--ideal for the forthcoming trial in Iraq of Saddam Hussein.

Kofi Annan, who grew up in Ghana, is a skilled diplomat who expressed in forthright terms his gratitude for the existence and the work of the United Nations Association. He also made clear that he is aware of the deep-seated indifference, even hostility, to the United Nations in parts of the American society. Among the influential people on the Council to the United Nations Association is the Rev. Bob Edgar, general secretary of the National Conference of Churches and a former member of Congress from Pennsylvania. He noted that United Nations Day, Oct. 24, falls this year on a Sunday. He expressed the hope that the 50 million congregants in the National Conference of Churches could this year, along with all believers, expressly pray for the United Nations that day. His pleas reminded me of the failure of Catholic leaders to work actively for restructuring the United Nations. For 50 years several popes have spoken to the General Assembly. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

United Nations Needs Streamlining
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.