A Woman Who Lived Sin Fronteras

By Leyva, Yolanda Chavez | The Progressive, August 2004 | Go to article overview

A Woman Who Lived Sin Fronteras


Leyva, Yolanda Chavez, The Progressive


In the mid-1970s I was an under-graduate student at the University of Texas at Austin, majoring in business administration. It seemed practical for a first-generation college student. The only thing that kept me going during those years on campus was the presence of a small group of Mexican American women faculty whose dedication to community and scholarship inspired me. One woman was Gloria Anzaldua, then a graduate student in her mid-thirties, who taught in Mexican American Studies. She died on May 15 at the age of sixty-one from complications associated with diabetes.

When I heard that she had passed away, memories came flooding back: her constant admonition to "read more!"; her willingness to share her work and knowledge with us; the way that she challenged students to listen to each other.

In the three decades since I sat in her classes learning about Mexican American literature, history, and art, Gloria published groundbreaking works on gender, sexuality, race, and class. She influenced scholars, activists, and countless students across a variety of disciplines.

Born in South Texas in 1942, an area with a long history of racial discrimination and violence against Mexican Americans, Anzaldua attended segregated schools is a child. She leaned English after beginning school but never gave up Spanish. Coming of age between two nations, as well as multiple cultures and languages, Anzaldua understood borders. She wrote, "I have been straddling [them] all my life. It's not a comfortable territory to live in, this place of contradictions."

Anzaldua concerned herself not just with the physical U.S.-Mexican borderlands. She explored "wherever two or more cultures edge each other, where people of different races occupy the same territory, where lower, middle, and upper classes touch, where the space between two individuals shrinks with intimacy." For her, the borderlands were physical, psychological, spiritual, and sexual. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Woman Who Lived Sin Fronteras
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.