They Dress to Express; Political T Shirts-On the Right and the Left-Pit Teenagers against Their School Administrators

By Juarez, Vanessa | Newsweek, October 4, 2004 | Go to article overview

They Dress to Express; Political T Shirts-On the Right and the Left-Pit Teenagers against Their School Administrators


Juarez, Vanessa, Newsweek


Byline: Vanessa Juarez (With Claire Sulmers)

When Tim Gies was a sophomore at Michigan's Bay City Central High School, the United States was preparing to go to war in Iraq, and Gies became so passionate about politics that he began wearing his views on his sleeve--literally. He started producing his own line of antiwar, anti-Bush apparel by painting symbols and slogans onto T shirts and sweat shirts. When school administrators noticed, they weren't pleased and told him many times to remove his tees. Gies refused, and was repeatedly suspended for weeks at a time. "I just wore the shirts and took the punishments," recalls Gies, now 17. When the administrators threatened Gies with expulsion earlier this year, Gies called the local ACLU--which notified the school that it was infringing on its student's First Amendment rights.

In this election season, pundits and pollsters are anxiously studying the youngest voters, hoping that on Nov. 2, kids will demonstrate that their passions go beyond the latest lip gloss or basketball kicks. But in high schools across the country, there are more kids like Tim Gies sparking controversy by wearing their political beliefs emblazoned on their backs. Since 2001 there have been more than a dozen highly publicized cases of kids and school administrators clashing over T-shirt slogans, and many of those cases have wound up in court. Until this year, most school dress-code disputes were related to gangsta gear or showing too much skin, says Jennifer Dounay, a policy analyst for the Education Commission of the States. Politics "does seem to be a recent development or a redevelopment, if you want to call it that." Regardless of which wing or party they represent, teens are making their fashion statements political.

In the only known case of its kind, monetary damages--$30,000--were awarded this year to a plaintiff in a T-shirt dispute. Nicky Young, 16, together with her mother, sued the City of New York after Nicky was sent home from her Queens public school for wearing a shirt that said BARBIE IS A LESBIAN. Young was moved to wear the T shirt, she says, after her teacher told her that all gays were going to hell. Last year Bretton Barber, a Dearborn, Mich., student, was reprimanded for wearing a T shirt that read INTERNATIONAL TERRORIST next to an image of President Bush. He contacted the ACLU; the group filed a lawsuit and won. These skirmishes take place on the right as well. Elliot Chambers, a student at Minnesota's Woodbury High, attended class in 2001 wearing a T shirt with the words STRAIGHT PRIDE. After the school principal forbade him from wearing the shirt again, Chambers's parents filed a lawsuit on his behalf, and a federal judge ruled in their favor. And earlier this year Daniel Goergen was barred from wearing his hooded ABORTION IS HOMICIDE sweat shirt to his Newport News, Va. …

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