A Town Full of Drinkers; ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS

Daily Mail (London), September 30, 2004 | Go to article overview

A Town Full of Drinkers; ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS


QUESTION How did the town of Hot Coffee in Mississippi get its name?

HOT COFFEE is one of several small towns that make up Covington County in Mississippi - a place the size of Wiltshire, with a population of 17,000.

Its claim to fame, other than its odd name, is the fact that Sixties Hollywood starlet Stella Stevens grew up in the area.

In the early 1800s, the town was on the route between Jackson, the state capital, and the city of Mobile in Alabama. An enterprising local named Levi Davis built a small inn for those making the journey and placed a sign outside saying 'Hot Coffee' to entice them in. The area grew, and kept the name.

John Kirk, Stirling.

QUESTION I've heard of a man who, if seen wearing a balaclava, would get an immediate jail sentence. What has been the most amusing antisocial behaviour rule given out by a court?

THE Crime And Disorder Act 1998 created a system for the police and local authorities to request Anti Social Behaviour Orders, better known as ASBOs.

These orders, made by a magistrate, are issued against a person or group who have been shown to display antisocial behaviour - be it noisy and abusive neighbours to prostitutes touting for business.

Breaching an ASBO is a criminal offence, and a person doing so will face imprisonment ranging from six months to five years.

Among the more bizarre recent ASBOs is the car thief from Teesside who is banned from every car park in the country, and from wearing hats (so CCTV can identify him).

In Oldham, a 19-year-old man is banned from shaving the name of his gang in his hair. In London, a known burglar is banned from knocking on doors or phoning households without permission.

A man in York has even been banned from all NHS buildings after continually entering hospitals to supply his fetish for medical equipment.

Sarah Golding, Durham.

QUESTION As a schoolboy in the Forties, I remember a poem that began: 'What have they done to you, my England?' Does anyone recall the full words?

IT'S actually a misquote of England, My England by W. E. Henley (1849-1903). It goes like this: What have I done for you, England, my England?

What is there I would not do, England, my own?

With your glorious eyes austere, As the Lord were walking near, Whispering terrible things and dear As the Song on your bugles blown, England - Round the world on your bugles blown!

Where shall the watchful sun, England, my England, Match the masterwork you've done, England my own? …

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