Political Correctness Is Ridiculous to Nicholas

The Birmingham Post (England), October 2, 2004 | Go to article overview

Political Correctness Is Ridiculous to Nicholas


Nicholas Soames, the portly shadow Defence Secretary, has never been a man to mince his words or to have any truck with political correctness.

He has indeed been known to upbraid women MPs for wearing trousers in the House of Commons rather than skirts. And it was with admiration that this man from the hunting, shooting and fishing sector of the Conservative Party once likened his newly-arrived baby daughter to a salmon.

One woman, who wished to remain nameless, has compared making love with Mr Soames as rather like a wardrobe falling on you with the key still in the door.

He has never been shy about taking the mickey, in an amiable if annoying way, out of his political opponents. For instance, he used to cry out across the Commons chamber to John Prescott, a former steward on liners: 'Another large gin and tonic, Giovanni, please.'

And once when he encountered the snappily-dressed Paul Boateng, Chief Secretary to the Treasury, in a dapper new suit with the stitching showing -the height of fashion at the time - he cried out: 'One more fitting at the tailors, Boateng, and it should be all right.'

The Labour MP Chris Bryant, who appeared on a 'gay' website clad only in his Y-fronts, also fell victim to Mr Soames's jibes: 'I nearly didn't recognise you with your clothes on, Bryant,' he shouted. …

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