Canadians Pay a Lot to Get Generic Drugs; U.S. Cost Part of Import Debate

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 2, 2004 | Go to article overview

Canadians Pay a Lot to Get Generic Drugs; U.S. Cost Part of Import Debate


Byline: Marguerite Higgins, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Canadians pay more than most countries for generic drugs, according to a recent economic report.

The study by a Canadian think tank comes as the high cost of prescription drugs and health insurance are debated as major domestic issues in the U.S. presidential election campaign.

Legalized drug importation from Canada has become a big issue nationwide as senior citizens and city and local governments hunt for cheaper drugs. The Montgomery County Council last week approved a drug plan that challenges the Food and Drug Administration's ban of drugs imported from Canada.

But while Canada's prescription drugs are cheaper, generic drug prices there are considerably higher than those in eight industrialized countries, according to the Fraser Institute report released in August.

Canadians pay about 30 percent more for generic, or nonpatented, drugs than patients in other countries including the United States, Britain, Germany, Sweden, Italy, France, New Zealand and Australia. Switzerland was the only country in the study that had higher generic drug prices.

Brett Skinner, the author of the study and a research manager at the institute, said he pulled most of the information from public studies done by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Canada's Patented Medicine Prices Review Board.

He concluded that the Canadian government's price controls on brand-name, patented drugs and restrictions against importing foreign generic drugs have artificially inflated prices for consumers.

The Apotex Group of Cos., a Toronto manufacturer of 150 generic drug lines, called the study a lobbying effort by multinational drug companies to change the Canadian health system.

The Fraser Institute receives 5 percent of its annual funding from the pharmaceutical industry, Mr. Skinner said.

"Generic prices are high, depending on how you look at the data," said Apotex spokesman Elie Betito.

Generic drugs make up 40 percent of prescriptions in Canada, accounting for 15 percent of the $15 billion spent on prescription medications annually, Mr. Betito said.

Nearly 50 percent of all U.S. prescriptions are filled with generic drugs, up from 19 percent in 1984, according to recent data from Cutting Edge Information, a Durham, N.C., research services company.

U.S. sales of generic drugs increased from $12 billion in 2001 to $15.4 billion in 2002 and are projected to top $22 billion in 2005, the company said in May. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Canadians Pay a Lot to Get Generic Drugs; U.S. Cost Part of Import Debate
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.