Feng Shui? No, It's Funky Shui, a Fun Way to Dress Up Your Home

By Allport, Brandy Hilboldt | The Florida Times Union, October 2, 2004 | Go to article overview

Feng Shui? No, It's Funky Shui, a Fun Way to Dress Up Your Home


Allport, Brandy Hilboldt, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Brandy Hilboldt Allport, The Times-Union

Design trendwatchers and philosophers know feng shui is the ages-old Eastern practice of arranging objects to promote harmony in the home. The theoretical art now has a whimsical counterpart.

"Funky Shui also utilizes furniture and object placement," Jennifer and Kitty O'Neil write in the introduction to Decorating with Funky Shui. "If you begin losing fun energy through the back door, Funky Shui might advise you to block its escape with a trio of alert lawn penguins."

The four rules to achieving funky nirvana are:

1. Find the playful center: Create a conversation piece.

2. Color me funky: Brighten up with color.

3. Enlighten-up: Light up your life with delightful lighting.

4. Abundance through abundance: Celebrate your favorite things.

The 132-page book gives specific examples of how to implement these four steps. (Conversation pieces come in all shapes and sizes: a wall of old license plates, a framed theater poster from you favorite movie, your name spelled out in mismatched store sign letters.)

Scattered amid the bright photos of vignettes are lists of suggested color schemes (candy apple, serenity sage, moonstruck), cool things to collect (Cracker Jack prizes, wind-up toys, Happy Meal toys) and pithy advice (A disco ball in your living room is a party that's always happening. Ungrouped items equal clutter. Grouped items equal conversation pieces. Framing your child's painting makes your home the Museum of Really Modern Art.)

If you're timid, the book will inspire enough temerity to display souvenirs, collectibles and garage sale oddities that came off as a bit too kitschy once you got them through the front door. …

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