URE A DRUNK; Star Midge's Booze Agony. and the Ultimatum That Saved His Life

The Mirror (London, England), October 7, 2004 | Go to article overview

URE A DRUNK; Star Midge's Booze Agony. and the Ultimatum That Saved His Life


Byline: EXCLUSIVE By RON MOORE Chief Reporter

SCOTS rock legend Midge Ure has lifted the lid on the booze binges he feared would kill him.

The Live Aid hero confesses his alcohol problems in a new autobiography, If I Was..., out today.

Midge, who beat the bottle after a 10-year battle, reveals that he was told he would die if he didn't stop drinking.

The former Ultravox frontman masterminded the Band Aid and Live Aid charity music events along with Bob Geldof, raising millions for Ethiopia.

But fame and living the rock'n'roll lifestyle led Glaswegian Midge to the brink.

And Midge, who turns 51 next week, admits he is still in recovery after his alcohol abuse.

Midge revealed that it took an ultimatum from second wife, Sheridan - who demanded that he quit - to help him turn the corner.

Midge said: "I drank because I could. The rock and roll lifestyle is synonymous with excess - that is all part of the bravado.

"It went on like that until Sheridan told me I was going to kill myself. She told me I should stop drinking.

"Ten years' ago, I was drinking a bottle of Jack Daniels a day - or night, should I say.

"I could polish off a bottle and not feel completely and utterly smashed." The dad-of-four also tells in the book how he sneaked around his local off-licences buying vodka in a bid not to get caught

Eventually he couldn't get out of bed without having a drink. Finally, he got the shock of his life when doctors said his endless binge-drinking had shrunk his brain.

After relapsing and hitting the bottle again, Midge has been sober for over a year.

In "If I Was...", Rangers fan Midge also reflects on his roots and tells how sectarian hatred and bigotry in the west of Scotland blighted his life.

Midge broke into the music scene as a guitar-strumming child of the sixties after listening to The Small Faces, The Who and The Beatles. …

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