Culture Vulture: Philosophy? No, We're All Right, Jacques

The Birmingham Post (England), October 18, 2004 | Go to article overview

Culture Vulture: Philosophy? No, We're All Right, Jacques


A s a tribute to the newlydeceased great French philosopher Jacques Derrida, the Vulture is hoping that all visitors to his corner this week will not actually READ what follows. Please DECONSTRUCT it instead. If you don't know what we're on about here, that's fine, because most professional philosophers, particularly the English ones, don't seem to understand dear old Jacques too well either.

Here's some stuff to deconstruct. We ran a competition in last week's Post Style to find Birmingham's answer to Bridget Jones, a promotion by Mullerlight to tie in with the release of the follow-up film. You may have missed it, but you surely won't miss another movie-related event on Friday.

There is to be a super-duper zappy laser light show in Brum city centre. There's apparently a whole host of prizes on offer on packs of Mullerlight products (Chardonnay and holidays in Thailand, for example) so get chomping that yogurt - if you can do that to yogurt, which Jacques Derrida doubted.

Vulture believes he also doubted the existence of Gene Pitney, but anyone going to Symphony Hall on October 24, when the veteran America pop legend will appear, will know better. He's the 24 Hours from Tulsa singer/songwriter who has a string of international hits (like Rubber Ball) as long as a philosophy textbooks.

Gene Pitney is his real name, incidentally, although early in his career he was called Billy Bryan and his record company wanted to call him Homer Muzzy.

Actually, the guy made a huge contribution to studio techniques - his degree course was in electronic engineering and he came up with all sorts of weird ways of getting round problems - and keeping his own studio costs down.

Like Derrida, he has a welldeserved reputation as an all-round entertainer, and his Brum show is sure to be a sell-out.

There'll be fireworks on November 4 this year, Vulture hears, when the new Hyatt Regency Hotel opens its new Aria restaurant and Bar Pravda, er, bar, all part of the pounds 4m makeover. Vulture will be hovering nearby.

Sutton Arts Theatre, which, as far as anyone knows was never visited by Jacques Derrida, is currently enjoying its Diamond Jubilee Season and, looking forward to the next 60 years, has set up its own website, developed by a professional, Michael Flaherty.

www.suttonartstheatre.co.uk Couple of plugs for the excellent Huntingdon Hall, Worcester. Modestly billing themselves as 'The best celtic live act in the world' Rock, Salt and Nails are performing on November 2 and a couple of days later another Irish favourite headlines when Niamh Parsons is in concert with Graham Dunne.

Darren Stocker and Andy Robbins have traded in London salaries and city living for the opportunity of working for the successful Evertons' Group in Worcestershire.

Darren is the new head chef at The Crown & Sandy's in Ombersley and Andy is in charge at the Hadley Bowling Green Inn and both have a brief to try to source lots of local produce and ingredients.

Tanya Batt tells stories from New Zealand in the Storytelling Cafe at the Mac on Wednesday, and nearby in Cannon Hill Park Circus of the Streets is in the big top from tomorrow until Sunday.

Over pounds 300 was raised from Birmingham Hippodrome Friends who visited the National Trust Back to Backs houses prior to their opening in July. The money will be put towards transport costs, enabling hundreds of Midlands children to visit the National Trust attraction and take in a tour of Birmingham Hippodrome as part of a joint education project between the two organisations.

For further information on Birmingham Hippodrome Friends scheme contact Naomi Said on 0121 689 3068.

Here's something Derrida would have loved. Kate Pemberton is showing her new project at New Forms Festival in Vancouver until October 28.

If you fancy a look go to http://ems. …

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