Karen Bartlett Column

The Journal (Newcastle, England), October 19, 2004 | Go to article overview

Karen Bartlett Column


Byline: By Karen Bartlett

Slow down. Is the pace of change too much? For some the answer is yes, and their solution would be to turn the clock back to a quieter time.

This idea first took seed appropriately with food. Those rushed meals, the snatched sandwiches on the bus. And what about all that supermarket food; the fruit that never goes ripe only rotten, the plastic wrappings, the portions of pale and quivering chicken.

Surely there was a more innocent age when strawberries still had seasons, vegetables grew in the back garden until they were ready to be dug up and bread went stale (not like today when it can sit, spaced out in a state of chemically induced sponginess, for several weeks).

And then when this lovingly tended produce is ready to reach the plate it should be eaten slowly, by families. Around the kitchen table. Like they do in Italy ( or at least in Olivio ads.

After you have had your first "taste education" as the "slow food" movement calls it, you probably won't want to rush off anywhere. More likely you will cruise somewhere slowly. Hopefully your car will have a tiny environmentally friendly engine and not be able to take you much beyond 50 miles an hour on the motorway.

But in case you do get carried away, every street will be littered with speed humps that make your exhaust fall off and give you brain damage from repeatedly hitting your head on the inside of the roof.

The understandable concerns that gave rise to the slow food movement have now spread into the general hotchpotch of our fantasies about green rural living. People have started supporting "slow cities" "slow travel" (although I do believe this was dreamt up some years ago by British Rail).

Now there are calls for slow work and slow parenting. I'm not sure what the CBI would say about "slow work", although personally I'm all in favour of it. But slow parenting? What does that mean?

We British don't like new fangled fast things. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Karen Bartlett Column
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.