Hospitals with Second Opinion Policy Perform Fewer Cesarean Sections

By London, S. | International Family Planning Perspectives, September 2004 | Go to article overview

Hospitals with Second Opinion Policy Perform Fewer Cesarean Sections


London, S., International Family Planning Perspectives


In Latin America, where the overall rate of cesarean section is among the highest in the world, cesarean rates at 17 hospitals that mandated a second opinion for nonemergency procedures decreased by 7% in relation to those at comparison hospitals. (1) The benefit was due mainly to a 13% relative reduction in the rate of intrapartum cesarean sections (those performed during labor). Implementation of the second opinion policy was not associated with any adverse changes in measures of maternal and neonatal well-being. In addition, women delivering at hospitals with the second opinion policy were as satisfied with their care as were women delivering at hospitals following usual policy.

Hospitals were eligible for the study if they had a cesarean section rate of at least 15% and had more than 1,000 deliveries per year. Matched hospitals were randomly assigned to an intervention group or a control group. Hospitals in the intervention group implemented a mandatory policy that when an attending physician decided a woman needed a nonemergency cesarean section, the physician had to obtain a second opinion from another physician of equal or higher clinical status. The consulting physician applied evidence-based guidelines and discussed the case with the attending physician, who made the final decision. Changes in group outcomes between the six-month periods preceding and following implementation of the intervention were compared.

Analyses were based on data from 149,276 women who delivered at 34 hospitals in Argentina. Brazil, Cuba, Guatemala and Mexico between October 1998 and June 2000. Nearly all of the hospitals were public or nonprofit. Data collected during the first six-month period revealed that intervention and control hospitals had similar overall cesarean section rates (26% and 25%, respectively) and proportions of women who had had a previous cesarean section (14% at each), but intervention hospitals had a higher overall rate of intrapartum cesarean section (17% vs. 15%) and a higher proportion of women having their first birth (38% vs. 34%).

Hospitals in the intervention group experienced a small but significant reduction in the rate of all nonemergency cesarean sections relative to that of hospitals in the control group (relative rate reduction, 7%). This reduction reflected a relative reduction of 13% for the intervention hospitals in the rate of intrapartum cesarean sections and a relative increase of 2% in elective procedures. Relative reductions also varied according to the reason for the cesarean section and were greatest for those done for maternal health (29%), fetal distress (22%) and slow progression of labor (20%). …

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Hospitals with Second Opinion Policy Perform Fewer Cesarean Sections
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