British Troops under American Orders? No Thank You

The Journal (Newcastle, England), October 21, 2004 | Go to article overview

British Troops under American Orders? No Thank You


What is this I hear in the news? The Americans may ask the British Army to help them out in Iraq. In addition they are expected to be under orders from the Americans.

No thank you, I say. I have seen enough of American decisions in the last war. I was in the RAF and some of the decisions were catastrophic, they bombed wrong targets, even bombed our own troops.

Converse with any ex-Army soldier and they will most certainly give it the thumbs down as they had plenty of the same.

They are shouting for our help because they cannot cope.

I hope Tony Blair does not turn soft on them and allow them to take over. Our lads have done their job, do not let them go and do theirs.

NORMAN WARDLE,

Surely we must rid ourselves of the Blair government

I AM at a loss to understand how or why this government remains in power. Regardless of the perceived merits or faults of the opposition parties, surely we must rid ourselves of Blair's lot.

If the council demolishes your new home by mistake or the hospital mislays your baby, mere apology is simply not good enough. Just multiply these little hiccups by the price of Tony's new house and you may get an idea of how bad the Blair government is, but all we seem to be seeking is for the Prime Minister to repent. Sorry! but it is much too late for more meaningless words that flow from him almost as freely as do illegal immigrants into Britain.

New Labour's litany of deceit and incompetence is unsurpassed in our history. From the billion pound Dome fiasco to the iniquitous Iraq war, via stealth taxes, university fees, plundered pension funds, runaway illegal immigration and billions squandered on ever deteriorating social services, Tony's indiscretions and failures have us spiralling ever downwards. Yet all we ask is for him to say sorry?

While he promises military aid to Africa, our besieged Premier plans a reduction of the armed forces. Well his little indiscretions have to be paid for somehow and there is nothing left in the pension fund.

In Iraq our young men and women, under-equipped as they are, must fight for their lives in a hell on earth environment, fearful also that they may face civil courts for conduct too violent. Can we really allow the affairs of this wonderful country of ours, yours and mine, to be managed in such a slipshod manner by this utterly arrogant regime that seems to embody the worst aspects of a dictatorship?

After all that has gone before he emerges from this miserable chaotic jumble of mismanagement and deception like a man who believes he can walk on water, when the facts cry out that he cannot even swim.

To proclaim that his new Britain offers greater opportunities for us all. Does anyone seriously believe Mr Blair any more?

Surely we deserve someone better, and if the dividend for failure is a pounds 3.6m house, what would success bring? There should be no shortage of applicants.

DENIS GILLON,

We all pay too much into Government coffers

I FEAR for the country when it is led by dummies who don't understand the intrinsic value of possessions and are prepared to base the tax system on a total misconception.

Sadly I am not in the super tax bracket, but still it fills me with anger to see that higher levels are to be levied for properties that are judged, thanks to an inflated market (which is being encouraged by the Government as it brings in more revenue), to have risen in value, though in fact owners make no profit at all from inflation unless selling, nor do they lose if prices fall. Nothing gains or loses value due to market fluctuation if it is not for sale.

For Mr Prescott, it is punishing the idle rich folk for robbing the poor, but it affects all of us: the more your home is worth, the more tax is taken, and if you sell they collect again, so don't say in a fit of envy that the rich can afford it, we all pay too much into Government coffers, with too little to show for it. …

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