Reporting on the Status of Technology Education in the U.S.: The Data on STL and AETL Usage Is Positive in the Respect That More and More States Are Becoming Informed about What Technology/ Technological Literacy Encompasses

By Meade, Shelli D.; Dugger, William E., Jr. | The Technology Teacher, October 2004 | Go to article overview

Reporting on the Status of Technology Education in the U.S.: The Data on STL and AETL Usage Is Positive in the Respect That More and More States Are Becoming Informed about What Technology/ Technological Literacy Encompasses


Meade, Shelli D., Dugger, William E., Jr., The Technology Teacher


The International Technology Education Association's Technology for All Americans Project (ITEA-TfAAP) conducted a survey in the spring and summer academic semesters of 2004 to determine the current state of technology education. This survey was a follow-up to a 2001-2002 study by Pamela Newberry, former staff member at TfAAP, in 2000-2001 (Newberry, 2001). It is intended to contribute to longitudinal data on technology education.

As indicated by Newberry, states in the last two decades have moved toward mandating a core set of subject areas for all students as a way to meet national educational standards. This trend has been encouraged by the need for states to comply with the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act in terms of accountability. This survey sought to obtain a snapshot of the current state of technology education and place the data obtained in the context of the standards movement, NCLB requirements, and the increasing need for a technologically literate citizenry.

Survey Method

Questionnaires were sent via e-mail to all state technology education supervisors in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. In cases where no supervisor was available, alternate contacts in the state education departments were used. Telephone follow-up was conducted in summer 2004 to attempt to gather unreported data and clarify responses as necessary.

The survey consisted of five questions. The first three questions were duplicated from the Newberry 2000-2001 study. Questions 4 and 5 were added in the 2004 survey.

1. Is technology education in your state framework?

2. Is technology education required in your state? If so, at what grade levels?

3. How many technology education teachers are in your state?

4. Is Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology used in your state? If so, how?

5. Is Advancing Excellence in Technological Literacy: Student Assessment, Professional Development, and Program Standards used in your state? If so, how?

Based upon responses received by Newberry in 2001 and by TfAAP staff in 2004, telephone follow-up was conducted on Question 2, asking respondents to clarify their answers based on the following choices: yes, no, under local control, it is an elective. the requirement is pending/proposed.

The data tables that follow this report are abbreviated. Brackets indicate interpretation by TfAAP staff based upon the comments provided by the respondent. The full data tables with comments are viewable online at www.iteawww.org/TAA/Resources MainPage.htm

Who Responded?

All 50 states and the District of Columbia contributed to this survey. Puerto Rico did not respond, making the return rate 98%. For ease of reporting, the term "states" is used to refer to the 50 states as well as the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.

Technology Education in State Frameworks

Data indicate that 38 states 73.1%) include technology in the state framework. This is an increase over the 2001 report of 30 states (57.7%). Correspondingly, the number of states that answered "no" to Question 1 decreased from 18 (34.6%) in 2001 to 12 (23.t%i in 2004 (see Figure 1). New Jersey indicated that a proposal for state standards for technological literacy was being considered.

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

Out of the 38 states that responded affirmatively, five states (13.2%), Alabama, Hawaii, Kentucky, Oregon, and Vermont, indicated that technology education was part of a career preparation framework. Iowa includes technology education as part of "Industrial Technology," which also includes industrial education and trade and industry.

Also, five of the 38 states (13.2%) (Colorado, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire) commented that technology education was embedded into the curricular framework. In other words, technology education was not being delivered separately but as part of other core subject classes. …

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