Passing the School Bond: A Community Solution to a Local Problem

By James, Leona K.; Watt, Mary | Government Finance Review, April 1992 | Go to article overview

Passing the School Bond: A Community Solution to a Local Problem


James, Leona K., Watt, Mary, Government Finance Review


The City of Montrose, Colorado, home of the Black Canyon National Monument, is a progressive community located in a valley surrounded by mountains in the southwestern part of Colorado. Montrose was carved from the heritage of the old west, steeped in Indian, mining and cowboy lore, and now with a population of approximately 9,000 is stabilized by industry, tourism, agriculture and ranching.

Montrose, faced with today's modern problems, developed a unique approach to solve one of the community's major concerns. In january 1990, the new mayor of Montrose emphasized that the community had to find a way to better support its educational system. She challenged the city council, county commissioners and school district to work together toward developing new and innovative ways to provide better facilities for the schools.

The school district, standing alone, had not succeeded in having a school bond issue approved by the voters since 1973, and deteriorating and inadequate school facilities were a major concern. Although the school district had won recognition for the quality of the educational experience, the school facilities had deteriorated drastically. Two schools were condemned, two rural schools were closed to save money, and children were taught in churches, trailers and other temporary buildings.

From January to May 1990, with the help of a fact-finding committee organized by the Montrose Rotary Club, the three entities - the city of Montrose, the county and the RE-1J School District - moved forward on that challenge. Public hearings were held to gain insight into the reasons school bonds could not pass in Montrose. It became clear that increased property taxes were perceived as an unfair burden on property owners, especially farmers and business owners, during a time of difficult economic instability.

As a result of these findings, the city, the county and the school district signed a memorandum of understanding, recognizing that school facilities were the number one priority in the Montrose community and appointed two individuals from each jurisdiction to work on a school facilities funding committee.

The committee worked diligently to bring together a package that each entity could work with. In September 1990, the city council approved an intergovernmental agreement with the county and the school district, in order to provide the requisite financing to construct these critically needed school facilities.

The Solution

The solution negotiated through the intergovernmental agreement was to share the financial burden.

City of Montrose - A 1 percent city sales and use tax, pledging the lesser of 1 percent sales and use tax or $1,000,000 annually to the school district for capital needs until $3,000,000 is met; at which time the 1 percent sales and use tax would sunset.

County of Montrose - A 1 percent countywide sales and use tax, allocating 35 percent to the school district's capital needs until $3,000,000 is met; and 65 percent for jail facilities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Passing the School Bond: A Community Solution to a Local Problem
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.