Credit Use Strangles Wealth: African American Debt Is Increasing Taster Than Income

By Sidime, Aissatou | Black Enterprise, November 2004 | Go to article overview

Credit Use Strangles Wealth: African American Debt Is Increasing Taster Than Income


Sidime, Aissatou, Black Enterprise


America is a nation propped up on credit card debt, and data collected by the Federal Reserve shows that minorities are most at risk of damaging their financial futures due to poor credit card management. African American households, in particular were shown to spend larger percentages of their incomes paying credit card and other high interest rate debt, heading closer to foreclosure bankruptcy while enriching lenders.

Federal Reserve Senior Economist and Project Director Arthur B. Kennickell conducted a survey of consumer finances to determine the distribution of wealth in the U.S. between 1998 and 2001. It was found that minority families added on debt at a rate far greater than they increased their incomes, thereby reducing the overall wealth building power of every dollar they earned. Minority families also racked up more than twice the debt of their white counterparts. White households did, however, hold a higher debt load in actual dollars than their minority counterparts, but their percentage increase in debt did not surpass their average income growth level.

Credit card debt has caused African American families to use critical financial resources to pay mounting monthly interest payments instead of saving or acquiring assets such as real estate. It has also caused long-term disadvantages for African Americans because of the way lenders assign interest rams and insurance companies set premiums. Financial companies base interest rates on credit scores that are calculated, in part, by looking at how people use their credit and whether they pay their debt on time. The amount of debt a person has in relation to the overall credit available to them counts toward their credit score as well. Above-average debt means lower credit scores, for which lenders charge higher interest rates. (See "How to Get A-1 Credit," this issue.) Carrying a lot of credit card debt hurts the scores of African Americans significantly.

Unfortunately, most of the debt African Americans have accumulated is used for items that depreciate in value, such as cars, furniture, electronics, and appliances. This is an indication that blacks are using credit inappropriately--to stretch their incomes. But historic redlining by traditional banks has left high-interest credit cards as one of the few easily accessible sources of loans for minorities. Robert D. Manning, author of Credit Card Nation: The Consequences of America's Addiction to Credit (Basic Books; $18), looks at how the business of credit cards has grown. …

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Credit Use Strangles Wealth: African American Debt Is Increasing Taster Than Income
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