Peter Pan of Posh

Daily Mail (London), November 8, 2004 | Go to article overview

Peter Pan of Posh


Byline: HELEN WEATHERS

AS YOU might imagine for a man described variously as 'Britain's most eligible bachelor' and 'the biggest catch in England', the name of The Hon Robert Hanson has become synonymous with phenomenal wealth, exuberant self-indulgence and beautiful young women.

The 'playboy' eldest son of industrialist Lord Hanson, who died last week, is famed for his fondness of life in the fast lane and was, until recently, a seemingly permanent fixture on the London party circuit and a regular at society and royal events.

His own parties are legendary. At his 41st birthday bash, he ran up a [pounds sterling]20,000 bar bill at the Cafe de Paris, and at another champagne celebration a life-sized ice sculpture of a polo player on horseback - said to be inspired by Hanson himself - took pride of place.

Women were drawn to him and the lengthy list of names with whom he has been linked reads like a Who's Who of 'posh totty', with an assortment of models and the odd soap actress thrown in for good measure.

Texan model and heiress Normandie Keith - now married to Hanson's best friend Lucas White - is an old flame, as is It-Girl Tara Palmer Tomkinson. He was briefly engaged to the troubled underwear model Sophie Anderton and dated Lord Halpern's daughter Jenny, and Lord Baybrooke's daughter Cazzy, now the Countess of Derby.

His more unusual past amours include former EastEnders actress Martine McCutcheon, native American model Brenda Schad and Waffa Bin Laden, would-be pop diva and niece of Osama.

This year, the 44-year-old was seen squiring stunning blonde and wealthy Russian socialite Victoria Smirnoff, his guest at the Grand Prix in Monaco, Chicago-born model Kat Mack and, more recently, actress Anouska de Georgiou, 26, daughter of a multimillionaire financier.

Quite the womaniser, then, is Robert Hanson. Yet as he grew older and the girlfriends grew younger, friends nicknamed him 'The Peter Pan of Posh' because of his apparent refusal to grow up - something which reportedly drove his exasperated parents at times to despair of him.

But now, with the death of his father from cancer at the age of 82, there has been a profound shift in Robert's gilded life - and not only because he has become even richer.

He, his adopted brother Brook, 40, and half- sister Karyn, 50 - his mother's daughter from her first marriage - who were all at Lord Hanson's side when he died at his mansion near Newbury in Berkshire on Monday, are expected to share an estate worth close to [pounds sterling]50 million.

Lord Hanson's [pounds sterling]4 million winter mansion in Palm Springs, California, the Mail can reveal, is already technically owned by Robert, presumably to avoid inheritance taxes, and there are also homes in Berkshire and Knightsbridge which form part of the estate.

However, the question being whispered among his circle is: will he carry on being the ultimate ladies' man - merely richer and even more spoilt for choice - or will the loss of both his parents in the space of just eight months force him to grow up?

Early indications suggest it might just be the latter. Friends say that since his mother, former model Geraldine Kaelin, 75, died last February just weeks after being diagnosed with leukaemia, Robert Hanson has been a changed man.

ONlearning of his mother's illness, he started to distance himself from the lifestyle he knew both his parents hated - at one point even asking a columnist not to refer to him in print as a playboy.

In September, it emerged that Robert Hanson had put on the market his fully-staffed [pounds sterling]4 million Gloucestershire home - scene of many a frisky party in his heyday - to spend more time with his ailing, widowed father at his home in Berkshire.

Diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1998, Lord Hanson had been given the all-clear, only for the disease to return shortly after his wife's death. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Peter Pan of Posh
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.