Group Tries to Preserve Historic Cemeteries; West Augustine Improvement Association Clears Graveyards in Blighted Area

By Lewis, Ken | The Florida Times Union, November 5, 2004 | Go to article overview

Group Tries to Preserve Historic Cemeteries; West Augustine Improvement Association Clears Graveyards in Blighted Area


Lewis, Ken, The Florida Times Union


Byline: KEN LEWIS, The Times-Union

ST. AUGUSTINE -- Linda Murray knelt by the old grave site, clearing away weeds to show the symbolic chains on the stone.

As a member of the West Augustine Improvement Association, she is helping to clear the historic Pinehurst and San Sebastian cemeteries in a blighted area a few hundred yards west of St. Augustine city limits. When the volunteers started working, the acreage in West Augustine was so overgrown that many people didn't even know it was a cemetery.

"This man was born a slave," she said, goosebumps breaking out on her arm. "That's what the chain symbolizes. We have a lot of history, going back here."

Group members started cleaning and restoring the cemeteries in February. They meet the first and third Saturdays of each month from 9 a.m. to noon, and they say they need community support.

A project is under way to determine whether these or other cemeteries in St. Johns County are eligible for the National Register of Historic Places, said Charles Tingley, library manager of the St. Augustine Historical Research Library. It started after a state-requested survey of abandoned cemeteries was done by the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office in 1999.

Sheila Greenleaf, a training clerk with the Sheriff's Office, spent nine months tending to the cemetery with Howard Strickland and Judy Allen in 1999, she said. They cataloged the names on the gravestones and tried to find obituaries and death certificates. They gave a report about their work to the St. Augustine Historical Society.

The Sheriff's Office survey found 44 cemeteries in St. Johns County, from the well-kept to the abandoned, she said. Nobody is sure who owns the San Sebastian cemetery, but it is old enough to bear Union soldiers from the Civil War.

"We believe San Sebastian is probably the oldest black cemetery in the area," Greenleaf said.

She and her allies tended to San Sebastian in 1999 from January to October, but they couldn't get community support for continued maintenance.

"I took my husband's chain saw and just flat wore it out to death," Greenleaf said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Group Tries to Preserve Historic Cemeteries; West Augustine Improvement Association Clears Graveyards in Blighted Area
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.